phoresy

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Related to Phoretic: commensals

pho·re·sis

(fō-rē'sis), Do not confuse this word with pheresis.
1. Synonym(s): electrophoresis
2. A biologic association in which one organism is transported by another, as in the attachment of the eggs of Dermatobia hominis, a human and cattle botfly, to the legs of a mosquito, which transports them to the human, cattle, or other host in which the botfly larvae can develop. Synonym(s): epizoic commensalism, phoresy
[G. phorēsis, a being borne]

phoresy

(fôr′ĭ-sē)
n.
An association between two species in which one transports the other, for example when a mite attaches to a beetle and is carried to a new food source.

pho·ret′ic (fə-rĕt′ĭk) adj.

phoresy

a method of dispersal, e.g. of insect pests, in which the insect clings to a moving animal or other insect. Includes transmission of a parasite by a parasite, e.g. Histomonas meleagridis by Heterakis gallinarum.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Causes and consequences of phoretic behavior in the pseudoscorpion Dinocheirus arizonensis (Pseudoscorpionida: Chernetidae).
A review of the phoretic relationship between Mallophaga (Phthiraptera: Insecta) and Hippoboscidae (Diptera: Insecta).
Only two previously documented instances were found of phoretic uropodids on lizards, both in the Australian Region and both on skinks.
The natural history of a phoretic sphaerocerid Diptera fauna.
For example, inaccuracies in the measurement of the degree of host specificity among various phoretic and parasitic species of nematodes could easily confound estimates of [N.
This was an unfortunate classification, because given the title of Beier's paper, ever since then the interaction between pseudoscorpions and packrats has been regarded as phoretic in nature and not given further consideration, even though the pseudoscorpions are not riding on the rats for dispersal purposes.
Notes on conopid flies, including insect host, plant and phoretic relationships.
It is unlikely, therefore, that adult Mormotomyia are phoretic on bats or birds, although confirmation of this awaits examination of captured, living bats.
Although all these studies reported the association of non-symbiotic bacteria with entomopathogenic nematodes, none have described either the virulence of these associated bacteria, the phoretic ability of the nematode to transport these bacteria into the insect, how they are transported, or the level of association between the nematode and the bacterium.
An SEM study of leg features of adults, specifically the form and structure of the tarsal claw and pulvillus, was also conducted and these were compared to the same structures in examples of the true bat fly ectoparasitic families Nycteribiidae and Streblidae, and to the phoretic Mystacinobiidae.
Although the primary function of phoresy is dispersal, phoretic associations may be complex (Binns 1982; O'Connor 1982; Houck & O'Connor 1991).
Adults emerge inside the host nest, mating occurs outside, females lay eggs into or on plant tissue, and the very mobile first-instar larvae (planidia) are presumed to attach to foraging ant workers (or to intermediate hosts) for passive phoretic transport to the ant nest (Clausen 1940; Heraty 2000).