phonograph

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Related to Phonographs: phonography

phonograph

(fō′nō-grăf) [″ + graphein, to write]
An instrument used for the reproduction of sounds recorded on vinyl.
References in periodicals archive ?
After the phonograph became widely available in the late 19th century, people marvelled at the powers of the newfangled machine.
Q I have a tiny Pocket Phonograph Mikiphone System Vadasz record player.
The collector, who had been interested in phonographs since he was eight-years-old, was the proud owner of 10 of the cylinder machines "They all play" tow portables, a table model, a console and a horn gramophone.
Brunswick began to diversify and produce tires, toilet seats, wood piano cases, and phonograph cabinets.
For instance, Auguste Villiers de l'Isle-Adam's 1886 novel L'Eve future--in which an automaton rigged with phonographs takes the place of a beautiful but shallow woman--calls attention to the new technology's capacity for disturbingly lifelike mimicry.
It was only after 1898 that mechanical refinements to the phonograph, in addition to the stability of wax cylinders and plastic discs, led to a rapid increase in its popularity.
Spillers was founded in 1894 by Henry Spiller, at its original location in Queens Arcade, where the shop specialised in the sale of phonographs, wax phonograph cylinders and shellac phonograph discs.
It can be played only on a cylinder player that was a predecessor to phonographs, which played flat, vinyl discs.
It includes musical boxes, symphonions which played seven-and-a-half inch discs, organettes, phonographs, gramophones, an art deco combined wireless and gramophone, a pigmyphone for children, a doll's house record of less than two inches in diameter which plays God Save the King, and postcards and stamps of gramophone and music hall interest.
Knowing about Paul Hindemith and Ernst Toch's forgotten experiments with phonographs is interesting, but I would have preferred that Katz use his considerable intellect to also tackle the changes in recording wrought by the Beatles' Sgt.
Surrounded in performances and installations by numerous cast-off record players, Graeve can appear as a slightly disheveled or disorganized Philip Jeck, the Liverpool artist and turntablist who deploys arrays of mid-century Dansette phonographs. However, whereas Jeck creates atmospheric, almost cinematic soundscapes out of secondhand records, Graeve most often treats his equipment as electronic devices with intrinsic acoustic capabilities.
But in most cases, including phonographs, radio and cable TV, courts and Congress let them live.