philosophy

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philosophy

 [fĭ-los´ŏ-fe]
a system of beliefs and principles.
concordant philosophy a philosophical system used in kinlein, concerned with the practical aspects of a person on a day to day basis; a central principle is that of cordising. See also esca.

philosophy

(fĭ-lŏs′ō-fē)
1. The love or pursuit of knowledge.
2. A culturally determined system of beliefs, concepts, theories, or convictions.
References in periodicals archive ?
(14) John Stuart Mill, "Thoughts on Poetry and Its Varieties," Disxertations and Discussions: Political, Philosphical, and Historical (New York: Henry Holt, 1874-82) I, 97.
Decisions were made too far away -- in both geographical and philosphical terms -- from the stores.
They are not unrelated essays; the book is unified by a philosophical argument and method that generate a philosphical theory.
On one level, we might view their incorporeality as embodiments of a post-modern weltanschaung where scientific indeterminacy-hence, philosphical relativism--substitutes for blind faith; on another level, the people--these shady caricatures, these sketchy shades--seem real as some compulsion-driven folks we know.
Philosphical Arguments from an Evangelical Perspective
Robert Cox's work provides much of the philosphical inspiration for such "critical" rethinking of multilateralism.
The most eminent pupil and the eventual rival of Plato, Aristotle was simply called "the Philosopher" during the Middle Ages and is still thought of by many as the' greatest philosopher of all time, both on account of the keenness of his insight into the fundamental philosphical problems of knowing and being and on account of the encyclopedic character of his work.
His major philosphical breakthrough is derived from and replicates his sexual practices:
In `A Notebook', Hulme sets out his philosphical views in a more sustained way and with a stubborn moral commitment, reminiscent of Camus', to achieving clarity concerning the human condition.
Lewis, "Gorbachev and Ethnic Coexistence," Comparative Strategy, 8(4) (Fall 1989): 399-422; Other political leaders have succumbed to the idealistic belief that liberal values can unify societies, despite nationalist tensions, and also believe that they can subsume ethnic and nationalist identities through the propogation of broad, philosphical ideals, such as Pierre Elliot Trudeau, Le Federalism et la societe canadienne-francaise (Montreal: Les presses de l'Universite de Montreal, 1968), pp.
To conclude, as a treatise on "morality in general" Veritatis Splendor has serious scriptural, philosphical and theological flaws.