principle

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principle

 [prin´sĭ-p'l]
1. a chemical component.
2. a substance on which certain of the properties of a drug depend.
3. an accepted or professed rule of action or conduct; in a given philosophical system it is a fundamental or general law or truth from which others are derived. In bioethics some important principles are beneficence, justice, nonmaleficence, and respect for autonomy; these are derived in part from professional roles and traditions.
active principle any constituent of a drug that helps to confer upon it a medicinal property.
Bobath p's a type of neurophysiological rehabilitation; see bobath method.
Bohr's principle of complementarity reflexes do not independently account for the complex nature of infant behavior.
negentropic principle a principle of general systems theory stating that open systems have mechanisms that slow down or arrest the process of movement toward less efficiency and growth. Negentropy (negative entropy) is the tendency toward order and organization.
pleasure principle (pleasure-pain principle) in psychoanalytic theory, an inborn tendency to avoid pain and seek pleasure through the immediate reduction of tension by either direct or fantasied gratification.
reality principle in psychoanalytic theory, the ego functions that modify the demands of the pleasure principle to meet the demands and requirements of the external world.

prin·ci·ple

(prin'si-pĕl), Do not confuse this word with principal.
1. A general or fundamental doctrine or tenet.
See also: law, rule, theorem.
2. The essential ingredient in a substance, especially one that gives it its distinctive quality or effect.
[L. principium, a beginning, fr. princeps, chief]

principle

/prin·ci·ple/ (prin´sip'l)
1. a chemical component.
2. a substance on which certain of the properties of a drug depend.
3. a law of conduct.

principle of infinitesimal dose  a fundamental principle of homeopathy: the more a remedy is diluted (even to the point that none of the medicinal substance is likely to be present), the more powerful and longer lasting will be its effect.
yin/yang principle  in Chinese philosophy, the concept of polar complements existing in dynamic equilibrium and always present simultaneously. In traditional Chinese medicine, a disturbance of the proper balance of yin and yang causes disease, and the goal is to maintain or to restore this balance.

principle

[prin′sipəl]
Etymology: L, principium, foundation
1 a general truth or established rule of action.
2 a prime source or element from which anything proceeds.
3 a law on which others are founded or from which others are derived.

principle

Vox populi A guiding rule or maxim. See Bateman's principle, Bolam principle, Ceiling principle, Dale's principle, Eggshell skull principle, Fortner principle, Handicap principle, Heuristic principle, Homeopathic principle, KISS principle, Mendelian principle, Pleasure principle, Polluter pays principle, PRICE principle, Reality principle.

prin·ci·ple

(prin'si-pĕl)
1. A general or fundamental doctrine or tenet.
See also: law, rule, theorem
2. The essential ingredient in a substance, especially one that gives it its distinctive quality or effect.
[L. principium, a beginning, fr. princeps, chief]

prin·ci·ple

(prin'si-pĕl)
1. A general or fundamental doctrine or tenet.
2. Essential ingredient in a substance.
[L. principium, a beginning, fr. princeps, chief]

principle

1. a chemical component.
2. a substance on which certain of the properties of a drug depend.
3. a law of conduct.

active principle
any constituent of a drug that helps to confer upon it a medicinal property.
reasonable person principle
the basis for many decisions in cases alleging negligence. The court bases its judgment on what it considers a reasonable person, a reasonable veterinarian in our context, would have done in the circumstances. This is the evidence that most expert witnesses are asked to give, evidence about what should be expected of a member of their profession in terms of quality of performance. Called also principle of the reasonable person.
References in periodicals archive ?
She suggests that, after three decades of relative consensus over the institutions of the welfare state and of consolidation of a technical jargon within the profession, many thought that they could dispense with references to philosophical principles.
The winner will be the town that's judged best at applying philosophical principles to economic and community development and is interested in harnessing the arts as a catalyst for change.
A strength & conditioning coach by profession and a researcher by nature, Jim Murphy has been tracking down the best minds in baseball to determine the mental and philosophical principles of winning baseball.
Philosophers will find this book refreshing because of its synthesis and application of Kantian, Rawlsian, and other contemporary philosophical principles into tangible case studies.
The key to ultimate success is not to "reinvent the wheel" but instead to focus on the organizational and philosophical principles Robert Welch established for The John Birch Society in the first place.
Sousa (2000) pointed out that in the absence of sound philosophical principles to guide their decision making, teachers risk "selecting content, materials, and other curricular elements merely on the basis of intuition, tradition, and/ or packaged instructions" (p.
The swing voters--I like to refer to them as the idiot voters because they don't have set philosophical principles.
The declaration by which Americans made themselves independent marked the birth of the first nation in history grounded explicitly not on tradition, or loyalty to tradition, but on an appeal to abstract and universal and philosophical principles of political right.
The purpose of this paper is to assist policymakers and program administrators in replicating the SESS approach by describing its essential philosophical principles and structural components.
However, an interesting question here concerns the relationship between our own difficult decisions and philosophical principles.
It begins with core values and beliefs, the philosophical principles from which decisions are made.
He adopted the educational ideas of Froebel (based on an advanced concept of creative freedom and the use of open generation systems) and the philosophical principles and poetry of the American pioneer movement.

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