Pinel, Philippe

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Pinel, Philippe

(pē-nĕl′)
French psychologist, 1745–1826, who developed a method or system of treating the mentally ill without the use of restraint, at a time when use of restraint was the accepted form of therapy.

Pinel,

Philippe, French psychiatrist, 1745-1826.
Haslam-Pinel syndrome - see under Haslam
Pinel system - the abolition of forcible restraint in the treatment of mental hospital patients.
Pinel-Haslam syndrome - Synonym(s): Haslam-Pinel syndrome
References in periodicals archive ?
Principal researcher Alexandre Dumais was quoted in a press release on the Institut Philippe Pinel website, "an interesting feature of our results is that the association between persistent cannabis use and violence is stronger than that associated with  (https://blog.frontiersin.org/tag/alcohol-abuse/) alcohol  or cocaine."
Asked to distill a lifetime of success into a single nugget of advice for other venture capitalists, Shaw offers the words of an 18th century French physician named Philippe Pinel: "A wise man is cautious how he becomes the echo of a commonly received opinion."
A French physician, Philippe Pinel (1745-1826), thought that psychotics were sick in mind and deserved as considerate treatment as those who were sick in body.
Louise Fournier is Researcher, Research Center, Philippe Pinel Institute of Montreal.
In the 1800s, Philippe Pinel, founder of moral treatment, initiated humanitarian reforms to treat mental illness, unchaining Salpetriere's inmates.
In the 1790s Jean Baptiste Pussin, himself once an inmate at Bicetre, and the better known Philippe Pinel insisted that those deemed mad be released from their shackles and treated as patients suffering from "mental alienation," which might be cured by skillful therapeutic measures.
(48) Indeed, the replication of an ideal "family" was often the aim of the "moral treatment" in British, French, and American asylums, even among those who, like Philippe Pinel, advocated removing patients from particular familial situations which they saw as contributing to a disorder.