Philip

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Phil·ip

(fil'ĭp),
Sir Robert W., Scottish physician, 1857-1939. See: Philip glands.
References in periodicals archive ?
The daughter of Ferdinand and Isabella, Joanna married (1496) Philip the Fair of Flanders, whose infidelities probably aggravated her mental disorder.
Influence, however, was hardly a one-way street: Tess Knighton agrees that the Burgundian chapel was exemplary for the Spanish in the sixteenth century, but Burgundian courtiers were also highly impressed with Castilian custom and etiquette during the investiture of Philip the Fair as heir to the Castilian throne in 1502.
What relation, if any, he was to the Knight Templar of the same name who had been executed forty years earlier by Philip the Fair is not known.
1496 and 1534, a period when Alamire, that is, Petrus van den Hove-his pseudonym is derived from hexachord syllables--was a scribe associated first with the Marian Brotherhood in 's-Hertogenbosch and later with the courts of Philip the Fair, Marguerite of Austria, and the Archduke Charles (later Charles V).
It will no doubt become indispensable to scholars of Netherlandish music and culture, particularly the Burgundian-Habsburg courts of Philip the Fair, Marguerite of Austria, and Charles V.
The marriage took place in due course, on January 25th, 1308, at Boulogne, after a certain amount of hard bargaining between the representatives of Philip the Fair and Edward II.
Soon there were reports of Philip the Fair bringing his power to bear against the favourite.
The rise and fall of Cola di Rienzi (christened Nicolas di Lorenzo by his parents but brought up at Anagni, about sixty-five kilometres from Rome -- past home also of Pope Boniface VIII, whose resistance to the French king Philip the Fair at the turn of the century had provided a role model) cannot be understood without reference to the growing sense of frustration in fourteenth-century Italy at the contrast between Rome's past glories and her present indigent state.