Phialophora

Phialophora

 [fi″ah-lof´o-rah]
a genus of imperfect fungi. P. verruco´si is a cause of chromoblastomycosis and P. jeansel´mi is a cause of maduromycosis.

Phialophora

(fī'ă-lof'ŏ-ră),
A genus of fungi of which at least two species, Phialophora verrucosa and Phialophora dermatitidis (Exophiala dermatitidis), cause chromoblastomycosis.
[G. phialē, a broad, flat vessel, + phoreō, to carry]

Phialophora

/Phi·a·loph·o·ra/ (fi″ah-lof´ah-rah) a genus of imperfect fungi. P. verruco´sa is a cause of chromoblastomycosis; P. jeansel´mi is a cause of maduromycosis.

Phialophora

[fi′älof′orə]
a genus of imperfect fungi. P. verrucosi is a cause of chromoblastomycosis, and P. jeanselmei is a cause of maduromycosis.

Phi·a·loph·o·ra

(fī-ă-lof'ŏ-ră)
A genus of fungi of which at least two species, P. verrucosa and P. dermatitidis; causes chromoblastomycosis.
[G. phialē, a broad, flat vessel, + phoreō, to carry]

Phialophora

a dematiaceous fungus associated with phaeohyphomycosis and chromoblastomycosis.
References in periodicals archive ?
9,10) Sulfur granules, however, are not pathognomonic for Actinomyces because other organisms such as Nocardia, Sporotrichum, and Phialophora spp also produce them.
Used by ancient Egyptians for embalming, the fragrance-issuing resin is produced when the fungus Phialophora parasitica invades the Aquilaria tree.
Phialophora graminicola, a dark septate fungus, is a beneficial associate of the grass Vulpia ciliata spp.
When this tree's wood is infected with Phialophora parasitica, it produces a dark and fragrant resin from which the perfume ingredient is derived.
In many published case reports, etiologic agents were referred to as Phialophora pedrosoi or identified with the obsolete name F.
Phialophora jeanselmei, Pyrenochaeta romeroi, Leptosphaeria senegalensis, and Neotestudina rosatti.
These typically manifest as subcutaneous nodules appearing after minor trauma to the skin and inoculation with species of Exophiala, Alternaria, or Phialophora.
In addition to these two species, a Cladosporium species and a Phialophora species were also isolated from the bark of the billets.
Aspergillus species are the most common agents (widespread in soil, wood, and decomposing plant material), but Alternaria, Bipolaris, Curvularia, Exserohilum, and Phialophora species have also been reported.
Many fungi cause chromoblastomycosis, but it is most often caused by Fonsecaea pedrosoi, followed by Cladophialophora carrionii and Phialophora verrucosa, said Arnaldo Lopes Columbo, Ph.