pheromone

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pheromone

 [fer´o-mōn]
a substance secreted to the outside of the body and perceived (as by smell) by other individuals of the same species, releasing specific behavior in the percipient.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

pher·o·mone

(fer'ō-mōn),
A type of ectohormone secreted by an individual and perceived by a second individual of the same or similar species, thereby producing a change in the sexual or social behavior of that individual. Compare: allelochemicals, allomone, kairomone.
[G. pherō, to carry, + hormaō, to excite, stimulate]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

pheromone

(fĕr′ə-mōn′)
n.
A chemical secreted by an animal, especially an insect, that influences the behavior or physiology of others of the same species, as by attracting members of the opposite sex or marking the route to a food source.

pher′o·mon′al adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

pheromone

A secreted or excreted chemical factor that triggers a social response in members of the same species, which fall into one of three broad categories:  alarm pheromones, food trail pheromones, and sex pheromones.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

pheromone

An odorous body secretion that affects the behaviour of other individuals of the same species, acting as a sex attractant or in other ways. Pheromones are important in many animal species but, until recently, were thought to be unimportant in humans. It has now been shown, however, that the timing of ovulation in women can be controlled by pheromones from the armpit. This is believed to be the explanation of the fact that women living together will frequently develop synchronized menstrual cycles.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

pheromone

a chemical substance used in communication between organisms of the same species. Pheromones are found mainly in animals, but they occur in some lower plant groups where a chemical is secreted into water by female gametes to attract male gametes. In animals, for example, pheromones are transmitted in the air, as in female emperor and eggar moths, which secrete a chemical that is attractive to males over large distances, or by a dog marking out his territory with urine. Insect pheromones have been used to trap females of serious pests.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
In some US casinos, the slot machines even spray you with pheremones as you play to make you feel more aggressive and competitive
The day we can once again stand downwind of our idols without choking on a fug of whiff and pheremones can't come a day too soon.
Nah, it's all pheremones. And what about the high silica content?
(Pheremones are scents given off by deer that affect the behaviors of other deer.) The good news for the bowhunter is that if you are finding scrapes, then they were probably made by bucks two and a half years old or older.
They communicate with chemicals, use sex pheremones to attract mates, lay chemical trails for navigation, and produce a variety of toxins for defence, and venoms as weapons.
The good part about the Random House edition is that it was published in 1987 and therefore contains words like cryogenic and pheremones that weren't around for earlier dictionaries to include.
Money is beauty, money is sex, money is a party to which I've inexplicably been invited, wasabi roe and squab liver crostini, stock options like pheremones in the air, a ten million dollar house in Pacific Heights around which I wander with the discontented purity of a palace eunuch.
California-based Pherin Pharmaceuticals believe the pheremones in the spray they are developing induce calmness when they are detected by an organ in the nose.
PHYSIOLOGICAL RESPONSES TO OLFACTORY STIMULATION BY PHEREMONES. This study was designed to help determine if humans respond to pheromones as animals do.
The moths that smelled female pheremones started shivering faster, took off sooner and took flight at a lower body temperature than moths exposed to other, less enticing scents.
(Pheremones, like human hormones, produce a chemical reaction in cats that affects their behavior.) Instead, she says nepetalactone seems to have "excitatory and mildly hallucinogenic effects."
The detached sting then sends out alarm pheremones - volatile chemicals that alert nearby bees to the intruder's presence.