phenotype

(redirected from Phenotypes)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to Phenotypes: phenotypic variation

phenotype

 [fe´no-tīp]
1. the outward, visible expression of the hereditary constitution of an organism.
2. an individual exhibiting a certain phenotype; a trait expressed in a phenotype. adj., adj phenotyp´ic.

phe·no·type

(fē'nō-tīp),
The observable characteristics, at the physical, morphologic, or biochemical level, of an individual, as determined by the genotype and environment.
[G. phainō, to display, + typos, model]

phenotype

/phe·no·type/ (fe´nah-tīp) the entire physical, biochemical, and physiological makeup of an individual as determined both genetically and environmentally. Also, any one or any group of such traits.phenotyp´ic

phenotype

(fē′nə-tīp′)
n.
1.
a. The observable physical or biochemical characteristics of an organism, as determined by both genetic makeup and environmental influences.
b. The expression of a specific trait, such as stature or blood type, based on genetic and environmental influences.
2. An individual or group of organisms exhibiting a particular phenotype.

phe′no·typ′ic (-tĭp′ĭk), phe′no·typ′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
phe′no·typ′i·cal·ly adv.

phenotype

[fē′nətīp]
Etymology: Gk, phainein, to appear, typos, mark
1 the complete observable characteristics of an organism or group, including anatomical, physiological, biochemical, and behavioral traits, as determined by the interaction of genetic makeup and environmental factors.
2 a group of organisms that resemble each other in appearance. Compare genotype. phenotypic, adj.

phenotype

Genetics
1. Any observable or identifiable structural or functional characteristic of an organism.
2. The sum of the structural/physical and functional–biochemical, and physiologic characteristics of an organism, defined by genetics, modified by the environment. See Bombay phenotype, Mutation, Null phenotype, Para-Bombay phenotype, Swarmer cell phenotype, Trait. Cf Genotype.

phe·no·type

(fē'nō-tīp)
Manifestation of a genotype or the combined manifestation of several different genotypes. The discriminating power of the phenotype in identifying the genotype depends on its level of subtlety; thus, special methods of detecting carriers distinguish them from normal subjects from whom they are inseparable on simple physical examination. Phenotype is the immediate cause of genetic disease and object of genetic selection.
[G. phainō, to display, + typos, model]

phenotype

1. The observable appearance of an organism which is the result of the interaction of its genetic constitution and its subsequent environmental experience.
2. Any identifiable structural or functional feature of an organism. Compare GENOTYPE.

phenotype

the observable features of an individual organism that result from an interaction between the GENOTYPE and the environment in which development occurs. The interaction is that between nature and nurture. Variations due to nature are the inherited aspects of the organism, the genotype, while nurture denotes the (usually not inherited) effects of the environment upon the organism.

Sometimes two different genotypes give the same phenotype due to DOMINANCE (1) masking a recessive ALLELE. It is true to say however, that the closer we look at the effect of an allele the more likely we are to detect a special phenotype unmasked by dominance. For example, an allele may code for a nonfunctional enzyme and thus be hidden in a heterozygote (classifying the allele as recessive) but its effects may be detected by such methods as ELECTROPHORESIS, which can identify different forms of a protein.

Phenotype

1) The entire physical, biochemical, and physiologic makeup of an individual, as opposed to genotype. 2) The expression of a single gene or gene pair.

phenotype

an individual's characteristics, determined largely, but not entirely, by his/her genotype, as it can be influenced for example by environmental and maternal factors.

phenotype 

The observable characteristics (e.g. eye colour, height) of an individual that are the result of an interaction between the genes and the environment. See expressivity; genotype.

phe·no·type

(fē'nō-tīp)
Observable characteristics, at physical, morphologic, or biochemical levels of an individual.
[G. phainō, to display, + typos, model]

phenotype (fē´nōtīp),

n term referring to the expression of genotypes that can be directly distinguished (e.g., by clinical observation of external appearance or serologic tests).

phenotype

1. the outward appearance of the animal in all of its anatomical, physiological and behavioral characteristics as dictated by the genetic and environmental influences in its environment; in contradistinction to genotype in which only the inherited factors are taken into account.
2. an individual exhibiting a certain phenotype; a trait expressed in a phenotype.

Patient discussion about phenotype

Q. Can anyone with experience help me to know what the clinical phenotype of autism is? I am new to the medical field and I have been here for 3 months. Can anyone with experience help me to know what the clinical phenotype of autism is?

A. I welcome you to my favorite choice. This field is really very satisfying while we serve others for their good. Because of the similarities and differences among people with different forms of autism, health care professionals now view autism as having a broader clinical phenotype than was once thought. The expanded phenotype goes beyond the standard definition for autism, to include, as the DSM-IV states, a range of impairments rather than the absolute presence or absence of a certain behavior or symptom (DSM 1994).The DSM-IV uses the terms “pervasive developmental disorder (PDD)” and “autism spectrum disorder (ASD)” to describe five variations of autistic behavior; the International Classification of Disease (ICD), published by the World Health Organization (WHO) , has eight variations of PDD.

More discussions about phenotype
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition, researchers will have to make progress in the development of statistical analytic tools and molecular genetics to allow the study of more complex phenotypes and genetic information.
These results suggested that there may be a relationship between a patient's HLA phenotype and response to Melacine or other tumor vaccines.
Understanding the evolution of interacting phenotypes is further complicated because interacting phenotypes are simultaneously environments and evolving traits, thus the environment itself can evolve.
Ternary genotype code, Line-dot method, Modified Punnett squares, Ternary coded genotype probability groups, Line-dot hexagon, Genotype hexagon, Genotype to phenotype hexagon, Phenotype to genotype square.
As they analyzed the correlation of 663 neuronal phenotypes with genotypic data from 243 patients and 214 controls, and examined research practices and reporting bias in neurological disease models, they found that there is no established standard for the reporting of methods nor a defined minimal number of cell lines.
However, the observed phenotypes of the CC insertion mutation were highly diverse and the coat colour can range from white, red with black spotted, white with black spotted to almost solid black [25,30,31].
1% of MRSA isolates were resistant to clindamycin (incl cMLSB, iMLSB phenotypes and only CL resistant isolates, 3).
We then examined the association of hospital phenotypes with various hospital characteristics via bivariate analyses and a multinomial logistic regression model where the identified phenotypes were the dependent variable and hospital characteristics were candidate explanatory variables.
1]2-1 phenotype is associated to higher blood glucose levels and increased tendency to dyslipidemia and retinopatia.