phenobarbital

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phenobarbital

 [fe″no-bahr´bĭ-tal]
a long-acting barbiturate used as the base or the sodium salt as an anticonvulsant, sedative, and hypnotic.

phe·no·bar·bi·tal

(fē'nō-bar'bi-tahl),
A long-acting oral or parenteral sedative, anticonvulsant, and hypnotic; also available as a soluble sodium salt; also used in therapeutic management of epilepsy and induction of hepatic microsomal enzymes.

phenobarbital

/phe·no·bar·bi·tal/ (fe″no-bahr´bĭ-tal) a long-acting barbiturate, used as the base or sodium salt as a sedative, hypnotic, and anticonvulsant.

phenobarbital

(fē′nō-bär′bĭ-tôl′, -tăl′)
n.
A long-acting barbiturate, C12H12N2O3, used medicinally as a sedative, hypnotic, and anticonvulsant, sometimes in the form of its sodium salt.

phenobarbital

[fē′nəbär′bital]
a barbiturate anticonvulsant and sedative-hypnotic. Also called sodium phenobarbital.
indications It is prescribed in the treatment of seizure disorders and as a long-acting sedative.
contraindications Porphyria, severe pain, respiratory problems, or known hypersensitivity to this drug or other barbiturates prohibits its use.
adverse effects Among the most serious adverse reactions are ataxia, porphyria, paradoxic excitement, drowsiness, occasional rashes, and, rarely, blood dyscrasias. It is involved in many drug interactions.

phenobarbital

Neurology A long-acting barbiturate used as a hypnotic, sedative, hepatic enzyme inducer, anticonvulsant, given as a monotherapy for partial seizures, 2º generalized seizures; also used to treat diarrhea and to ↑ the antitumor effect of other therapies. See Seizures, Therapeutic drug.

phe·no·bar·bi·tal

(Pb, PB) (fē'nō-bahr'bi-tahl)
A long-acting oral or parenteral sedative, anticonvulsant, and hypnotic.
Synonym(s): phenylethylbarbituric acid, phenylethylmalonylurea.

phe·no·bar·bi·tal

(fē'nō-bahr'bi-tahl)
A long-acting oral or parenteral sedative, anticonvulsant, and hypnotic.

phenobarbital, phenobarbitone

a hypnotic, anticonvulsant and sedative.

Patient discussion about phenobarbital

Q. What are the Brands of Sodium-phenobarbitone drug in Bangladesh?

A. maybe this link will help-
http://www.medindia.net/doctors/drug_information/phenobarbitone.htm

if not- i recommend asking an Indian pharmacist..

More discussions about phenobarbital
References in periodicals archive ?
10 Compare another demiglorified demiphallus: "a tube of phenobarbitol lying on a small painted wooden frigate is enough to detach the room from the stone block of the building, to suspend it like a cage from heaven and earth" (OLF 79).
Hammargren prescribed quaaludes, valium, elavil, triavil, meprobamate, chloral hydrate, phenobarbitol, seconal, and talwin to combat her anxiety.
Model-actress Margaux Hemingway committed suicide by overdosing on phenobarbitol, the Los Angeles County Coroner's Office said Tuesday.
Comparison of the effects of propylthiouracil, amiodarone, diphenylhydantoin, phenobarbitol, and 3-methylcholanthrene on hepatic and renal [T.
R Karen (March 2001) has a 4-month-old with seizure activity who has been receiving phenobarbitol.
Carbamazepine* 4-12 mcg/mL >20 mcg/mL Ethosuximide 40-100 mcg/mL >200 mcg/mL Phenobarbitol 15-40 mcg/mL >60 mcg/mL Phenytoin 10-20 mcg/mL >40 mcg/mL Primidone 5-12 mcg/mL >24 mcg/mL Valproic acid 50-100 mcg/mL >200 mcg/mL *4-8 if patient is on multiple antiepileptic drugs ANTIDEPRESSANTS Lithium specimen collection: 12 hours after dose Lithium (acute) 1.
For example, early cessation of exposure to phenobarbitol has been shown to result in the spontaneous regression of preneoplastic lesions induced by the direct-acting carcinogen N-nitrosomorpholine (Bursch et al.
PCBs were grouped as follows: group 1, potentially estrogenic and weak phenobarbitol inducers (congeners 44, 49, 52, 101, 187, 174, 177, 157/201); group 2, potentially antiestrogenic and dioxin-like (congeners 95/66, 74, 77/110, 105/141,118, 156, 167, 128, 138, 170); and group 3, phenobarbital, CYP1A, and CYP2B inducers (congeners 99, 153, 180, 196/203, 183).
In this study, the authors constructed an environmental database for gene expression (EDGE) composed of libraries from mice treated with various toxins, including dioxin and phenobarbitol.