pharmacist

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pharmacist

 [fahr´mah-sist]
a person licensed to prepare, compound, and dispense drugs upon written order (prescription) from a licensed practitioner such as a physician, dentist, or advanced practice nurse. A pharmacist is a health care professional who cooperates with, consults with, and sometimes advises the licensed practitioner concerning drugs.

For a licensed pharmacist, five years of education is a minimum, and some curricula require six years. This gives the pharmacist advanced knowledge of the chemical and physical properties of drugs and their available dosage forms, and he or she is thus qualified to play a key role in supplying information about drugs (both prescription and over-the-counter) to patients—those to whom such information is most important. Since the pharmacist may be the last health care professional to communicate with the patient or a significant other before the medication is taken, he or she is therefore in an ideal position to discuss the drug with those concerned. The discussion may include any side effects associated with the drug, its stability under various conditions, its toxicity, its dosage, and its route of administration, all of which may be reassuring to the patient and be of benefit in helping insure patient compliance with the drug regimen.

phar·ma·cist

(far'mă-sist),
One who is licensed to prepare and dispense drugs and compounds and is knowledgeable concerning their properties.
Synonym(s): pharmaceutist
[G. pharmakon, a drug]

pharmacist

(fär′mə-sĭst)
n.
A person trained in pharmacy and licensed to practice.

pharmacist

A specialist health professional in the UK who makes, dispenses and sells medicines. Pharmacists in the UK typically work in a pharmacy retail outlet, which may be located near multiple GP practices.

Education
Four-year pharmacy course leading to a MPharm degree, followed by a one-year preregistration period in a pharmacy setting

Basis of UK pharmacy practice
Pharmaceutical chemistry
Origin and chemistry of man-made and natural drugs, isolation of drug compounds and their physical and chemical properties, and methods of analysis of biological activity of the drug.

Pharmaceutics
Preparation of medicines, including formulating drugs into dosage, quality control in industrial production and more traditional small-scale skills of medicine preparation.

Pharmacology
Actions and uses of drugs and medicines, especially as related to human physiology and biochemistry.
 
Pharmacy practice
Counselling, dispensing and ethical aspects of pharmacy, and relations with health professionals and aspects of health promotion.

pharmacist

Chemist–British Pharmacology A person qualified by a graduate degree in pharmacy, and licensed by a state to prepare, dispense, sell and control certain drugs Title RPh–registered pharmacist; a person holding a license in a particular jurisdiction to practice pharmacy. See Pharmacy, Practice of pharmacy. Cf Pharmacologist.

phar·ma·cist

(fahr'mă-sist)
One who is licensed to prepare and dispense drugs and compounds and is knowledgeable concerning their properties.
[G. pharmakon, a drug]

phar·ma·cist

(fahr'mă-sist)
One who is licensed to prepare and dispense drugs and compounds.
[G. pharmakon, a drug]
References in periodicals archive ?
Despite the order of the Supreme Court of Pakistan in 2006 for the appointment of pharmacists in hospitals and orders of the Punjab government in October 2012 to fill all vacant posts of pharmacists in hospitals still posts were vacant,he claimed.
* Increasing awareness of pharmacists' extensive education.
He said evidence from many developed countries show that pharmacists have a role in global health policy to lower medication misuse, drug abuse and lower financial burden.
He said that around 15,000 pharmacists are unemployed in the country, of which 7,000 belonged to Punjab, whereas most posts of pharmacists were lying vacant even in Lahore hospitals.
Mr Gething said: "Pharmacists play an increasingly important role in the delivery of healthcare in Wales.
Pharmacists working in the community can now offer more services than ever before and are often the first port-of-call for non-emergency healthcare needs.
He said that over 15,000 pharmacists were unemployed out of which 10,000 were only in Punjab.
The pharmacists appealed to the prime minister and the president to regulate the practice of pharmacists and make sure qualified pharmacists work at hospitals or medical stores, failing which they said they would have no other option but to hold protests.
"We will provide additional training to all of our pharmacists on appropriately handling these situations in accordance with our policy," said Polzin, who added that the details of the training were still being worked out.
Manasse Jr Professor and Dean Emeritus at the University of Illinois Chicago College of Pharmacy and former Executive Officer of the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists besides Jacqueline Surugue Lecturer UFR Sciences Pharmaceutiques former President of European Association of Hospital Pharmacists from France.