biological activity

(redirected from Pharmaceutically active)

biological activity

the inherent capacity of a substance, such as a drug or toxin, to alter one or more chemical or physiological functions of a cell, tissue, organ, or organism. The biological activity of a substance is determined not only by the substance's physical and chemical nature but also by its concentration and the duration of cellular exposure to it. Biological activity may reflect a "domino effect," in which the alteration of one function disrupts the normal activity of one or more other functions.
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Reddy's Laboratorie, Hyderabad, India, has been awarded a US patent for a method of making a depot comprised of forming an oil-in-water emulsion including a phospholipid, an oil, at least one hydrophilic water-soluble pharmaceutically active agent selected from the group consisting of vancomycin, gentamicin, a pharmaceutically-acceptable salt thereof and a mixture thereof and water; converting the emulsion to a monophasic solution; lyophilizing the monophasic solution to obtain a dry paste; adding a viscosity modifying agent to the dry paste in an amount sufficient to obtain a viscosity modified solution; removing at least some of the viscosity modifying agent to obtain a depot, and sterilizing the depot.
Objective: How will we meet the globally growing demand for pharmaceutically active compounds, nutrients and fine chemicals when crude oil resources are dwindling For decades, biotechnologists have been engineering microorganisms to produce valuable compounds from sugar and biomass.
Property Explorer was designed as a free tool to predict physico-chemical and toxicological molecular properties, which need to be optimized when designing pharmaceutically active compounds.
Its proprietary technology platforms enable attachment of pharmaceutically active molecules to specific sites within proteins more precisely than prior generations of bio-conjugates.
The company's proprietary technology platforms enable attachment of pharmaceutically active molecules to specific sites within proteins more precisely than prior generations of bio-conjugates and with precision similar to that used to design small-molecule drugs.
The discovery, using crystallography, of how the shape and chemical structure of enzymes explains how they catalyse reactions, quickly led to an understanding of how many poisons and pharmaceutically active molecules work.
Most alarming is the problem that supplement products may be laced with varying quantities of approved prescription drug ingredients, controlled substances, and untested and unstudied pharmaceutically active ingredients.
These products address consumer needs ranging from diseases to minor ailments to aspirations, and they use techniques that include pharmaceutically active ingredients with not-yet-fully-proven scientific claims to perceived benefits.
He covers the occurrence and fate of bulk organic matter and pharmaceutically active compounds in managed aquifer recharge, the fate of effluent organic matter during bank filtration, the fate of endocrine disrupting compounds, the role of biodegradation in removing pharmaceutically active compounds, organic micropollutant removal from wastewater effluent-impacted drinking water sources during bank filtration and artificial recharge, and a framework for assessing organic micropollutant removal during managed aquifer recharge.
Early chapters then cover current approaches to developing pharmaceutically active peptides, with case studies of the use of peptide drugs in cancer and AIDS.
In response to these concerns, The Research Triangle Environmental Health Collaborative organized an Environmental Health Summit to identify the major public health issues associated with the presence of pharmaceutically active chemicals in water.
It is known that many plants especially those used by traditional healers produce pharmaceutically active compounds that have antimicrobial, antihelminthic, antifungal, antiviral, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activity (McGaw et al.

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