female genital cutting

(redirected from Pharaonic circumcision)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
The disfigurement and/or removal of parts of the external female genitalia which is performed in many Central and West African countries and required for tribal identity; female ‘circumcision’ has deeply rooted cultural significance; male circumcision is a symbol of religious and ethnic identity, female circumcision is linked to a woman’s sexuality and her reproductive role in society

female genital cutting

Partial or complete surgical removal of the clitoris, a traditional practice in some African, Middle Eastern, and Southeast Asian cultures. The cutting usually is performed between the ages of 1 week and 14 years. The procedure is performed by nonmedical personnel without benefit of anesthesia or sterile conditions. The most common procedures are removal of the clitoral prepuce, excision of the clitoris, removal of the labia minora and sometimes most of the labia majora. The two sides may be sutured together to occlude the vagina. Possible immediate complications include infection, tetanus, shock, hemorrhage, and death. The possible long-term physical and mental disabilities include chronic pelvic infection, keloids, vulvar abscesses, sterility, incontinence, depression, anxiety, sexual dysfunction, and obstetric complications.
Synonym: female circumcision; female genital mutilation; infibulation (2).
References in periodicals archive ?
Her reasons for this were that the awareness-raising campaigns taught her that pharaonic circumcision was harmful and not a religious obligation.
Several representatives of organisations claimed that knowledge of the health complications of pharaonic circumcision had become widespread:
However, this participant also argued that knowledge of the health complications of pharaonic circumcision alone was not enough for people to abandon the phenomenon.
According to two of the nurses, as the practice of pharaonic circumcision has come under criticism, using a traditional circumciser is often more secretive than it was in the past.
One of the housewives in her 50s thought that older mothers and grandmothers could be convinced that pharaonic circumcision is bad, and as they were well respected in society, they could influence the decision whether to circumcise younger girls.
While there is growing acceptance that pharaonic circumcision is not religiously sanctioned, religious ideas about sunna cutting seem to be more ambiguous.
This has created the space for new ideas and understandings to emerge, and as a result, pharaonic circumcision appears gradually to be declining.
Whether by design or not, efforts to eliminate FGC in Somaliland have been focused on the elimination of pharaonic circumcision, rather than all forms of FGC.