phantom

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phantom

 [fan´tom]
1. an image or impression not evoked by actual stimuli.
2. a model of the body or of a specific part thereof.
3. a device for simulating the in vivo effect of radiation on tissues.

phan·tom

(fan'tŏm),
1.
See also: manikin. Synonym(s): phantasm
2. A model, especially a transparent one, of the human body or any of its parts.
See also: manikin.
3. radiology a mechanical or computer-generated model for predicting irradiation dosage deep in the body.
[G. phantasma, an appearance]

phantom

/phan·tom/ (fant´um)
2. a model of the body or of a part thereof.
3. a device for simulating the in vivo effect of radiation on tissues.

phantom

(făn′təm)
n.
Medicine A model of a human body or body part.
adj.
1. Believed to be real even though illusory: a phantom pregnancy.
2. Being a phantom limb: a phantom arm.

phantom

[fan′təm]
Etymology: Gk, phantasma, vision
a mass of material similar to human tissue used to investigate the effect of radiation beams on human beings. Phantom materials can range from water to complex chemical mixtures that faithfully mimic the human body as it would interact with radiation.

phantom

An object of specifically known dimensions and structural properties used to test or monitor an MRI system’s homogeneity, imaging performance and orientation.

phantom

Radiology A mass or dummy that approximates tissues in its physical properties that may be used to calibrate or determine the dose of radiation applied to a tissue. Cf Ballistic jelly.

phan·tom

(fan'tŏm)
1. Synonym(s): phantasm.
2. A model, especially a transparent one, of the human body or any of its parts.
3. radiology A mechanical or computer-originated model for predicting irradiation dosage deep in the body.
[G. phantasma, an appearance]

phan·tom

(fan'tŏm)
1. A model, especially a transparent one, of the human body or its parts.
2. radiology mechanical or computer-generated model for predicting irradiation dosage deep in the body.
[G. phantasma, an appearance]

phantom (fan´tum),

n a device that absorbs and scatters x-radiation in approximately the same way as the tissues of the body.

phantom

1. a model of the body or of a specific part thereof.
2. a device for simulating the in vivo effect of radiation on tissues.

phantom mare
a dummy of a mare used to collect semen for artificial insemination. A padded, hollow device about the height and width that would suit the stallion to be used. Excellent for collecting from an insecure or lame stallion.
phantom parturition
see false pregnancy.
phantom pregnancy
see false pregnancy.
References in classic literature ?
Though he looked the phantom through and through, and saw it standing before him; though he felt the chilling influence of its death-cold eyes; and marked the very texture of the folded kerchief bound about its head and chin, which wrapper he had not observed before; he was still incredulous, and fought against his senses.
Senor, devil take it if there's a sign of any man you talk of, knight or giant, in the whole thing; maybe it's all enchantment, like the phantoms last night.
But this encompassment of her own characterization, based on shreds of convention, peopled by phantoms and voices antipathetic to her, was a sorry and mistaken creation of Tess's fancy--a cloud of moral hobgoblins by which she was terrified without reason.
The capitularies of Charlemagne and of Louis le Débonnaire impose severe penalties on fiery phantoms which presume to appear in the air.
But the calm, luxurious life of Petersburg, concerned only about phantoms and reflections of real life, went on in its old way and made it hard, except by a great effort, to realize the danger and the difficult position of the Russian people.
He saw the tower, whither his charmed footsteps had brought him, swarming with dwarf phantoms, spirits, elfin creatures of the Bells.
Or he may see intellectual spectres and phantoms that are cosmic and logical and that take the forms of syllogisms.
These phantoms were so far from being phantoms that they were positively clinging on the ladder," said Levin.
I tell you," he cried, in a vibrating, subdued voice, and advancing one step nearer the bed, "that what it needs is not a lot of haunting phantoms that I could walk through--but a man
With tears and prayers and tender hands, Mother and sisters made her ready for the long sleep that pain would never mar again, seeing with grateful eyes the beautiful serenity that soon replaced the pathetic patience that had wrung their hearts so long, and feeling with reverent joy that to their darling death was a benignant angel, not a phantom full of dread.
When she and Robert stepped into Tonie's boat, with the red lateen sail, misty spirit forms were prowling in the shadows and among the reeds, and upon the water were phantom ships, speeding to cover.
It is the image of the ungraspable phantom of life; and this is the key to it all.