phantasm

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phantom

 [fan´tom]
1. an image or impression not evoked by actual stimuli.
2. a model of the body or of a specific part thereof.
3. a device for simulating the in vivo effect of radiation on tissues.

phan·tasm

(fan'tazm),
The mental imagery produced by fantasy.
Synonym(s): phantom (1)
[G. phantasma, an appearance]

phantasm

/phan·tasm/ (fan´tazm) an impression or image not evoked by actual stimuli, and usually recognized as false by the observer.

phantasm

[fan′taz′əm]
Etymology: Gk, phantasma, vision
an illusory image, such as an optical illusion of something that does not exist. See also phantom vision.

phan·tasm

(fan'tazm)
The mental imagery produced by fantasy.
Synonym(s): phantom (1) .
[G. phantasma, an appearance]
References in periodicals archive ?
Accordingly, the combination of the intelligible species with a person's phantasms cannot make the person a thing that thinks.
And therefore it is necessary, if the intellect is actually to understand its proper object, that it turn itself back upon the phantasms, in order to explore the universal nature existing in the individual.
initiates the necessary critique for the disillusioning of phantasms .
But the core of the book is a series of analyses of a central phantasm originating in the figure of the hanged woman Martha Brown, whom Hardy saw executed in 1857; linked in turn to historical memories of the torture and execution of Mary Channing in 1706, a story which Hardy returned to obsessively.
Those are only some of the highlights of an issue in which fantasies--Broadway pipe dreams, the poetical visions of master dramatists, the half-remembered phantasms of childhood-take on a vivid reality.
Moments later, the fall of the second tower generates further phantasms of nuclear winter and eerie silence.
Just as Micheaux created reflections of himself in his productions, these phantasms, in turn, mediated their maker.
52) There is consequently a loss of ontological value for those rungs on the ladder of being which are closest to matter: "the closer phantasms are to the unity of reason, the more intelligible they are.
Persons who are more anchored in real religion and history could probably dabble in RPG's with little deleterious effect; however, those persons who have no such anchors could in some cases fall prey to a riot of vain phantasms, leading to real personality difficulties.
Notable in this literature is the use of cases from Gurney, Myers, and Podmore's Phantasms of the Living (1886), as seen in the work of Gibson (1944), Schouten (1979), and Persinger (1987), among others.
Crouched against the panels, heads bowed, shoulders stooped, these phantasms become shrunken, lifeless victims.