Phalen's maneuver


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Phalen's maneuver

 [fa´lenz]
to detect carpal tunnel syndrome, the size of the carpal tunnel is reduced by flexion (or extension) of the affected wrist for 30 to 60 seconds, or by inflating a sphygmomanometer cuff around the involved hand to a point between diastolic and systolic pressure for 30 to 60 seconds. Pain or paresthesias occur along the distribution of the median nerve when the patient has carpal tunnel syndrome.
Pain and/or paresthesias are produced in the distribution of the median nerve when the hands are held in flexion for 30 to 60 seconds. From Goldman and Bennett, 2000.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
(3, 36) Reverse Phalen's maneuver (performed by having the patient maintain full wrist and finger extension for two minutes) changes the pressure within the carpal tunnel significantly more than Phalen's sign and it has been shown to add to the sensitivity of the conventional screening methods.
* Phalen's maneuver. The patient flexes his or her wrist with the elbow in full extension to increase pressure on the median nerve, and holds the position for 60 seconds.
The patient had signs of carpal tunnel syndrome, a positive Tinel and Phalen's maneuver, as well as a positive Durkin's compression test.
Testing may include fitness-for-duty, electronic screening, written exams, nonwork-related physicals, strength capability, clinical exams (e.g., Tinel's sign or Phalen's maneuver) and others.
A detailed neurological examination and tests for CTS including the Tinel's test, Phalen's and reverse Phalen's maneuvers, and carpal compression tests were performed.