phalange

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phalange

(fā′lănj′, fə-lănj′)
n.

phalange

any of the finger or toe bones associated with the PENTADACTYL LIMB. The proximal bone of the phalange articulates with the METACARPAL or METATARSAL.
References in periodicals archive ?
In a revenge attack, the Phalangists carried out an infamous massacre in the villages of Sabra and Shatila, slaughtering anywhere between 3,500-5,000 Palestinians.
The Israeli Army surrounded Sabra and Shatila and stationed troops at the exits of the area to prevent camp residents from leaving and, at the Phalangists' request, fired illuminating flares at night.
4, 1981, states that the Phalangists had taken "by force archaeological pieces from containers at the excavation site in [Jbeil] and moved [them] to the party quarters."
Bashir Gemayel founded the Lebanese Forces during the civil war and was comprised of disparate groups such as the Phalangists, the National Liberal Party, Al-Tanzeem Party and the Guardians of the Cedars, which played roles in the war that came to a halt in 1990 after Lebanese parliamentarians met in Taif in Saudi Arabia in 1989 and agreed to cease fire.
And with these old slogans will return old methods such as killing those "others" - "the preferred way being Sabra and Chatila," wrote Itani, referring to the 1982 massacre of Palestinians at the hands of the Phalangists, a part of the LF at that time.
In 1982, a constant state of siege received a boost when the Israeli army, along with their allies among Christian Phalangists, laid a brutal and deadly siege around Bourj el-Barajneh.
Jocelyn Khoueiri became an iconic image of women fighters for the Christian Phalangists.
(23) Direct responsibility for the massacre was laid at the feet of the Phalangists, who had entered the refugee camps with Israeli permission on the evening of September 16 and remained until the morning of the 18th.
on April 13, 1975, when gunmen killed four Phalangists during an attempt
The film builds toward the notorious massacres of Palestinians at Sabra and Shatilla, which Wolman accurately depicts as the murderous work of Lebanese Christian Phalangists, not Israelis.
The Bashir of the title is Bashir Gemayel, the charismatic leader of the Lebanese Christian Phalangists, who was assassinated in 1982, just after he was elected president of Lebanon.