phage

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Related to Phages: Bacteriophage therapy

bacteriophage

 [bak-te´re-o-fāj″]
a virus that destroys bacteria by lysis; several varieties exist, and usually each attacks only one kind of bacteria. Certain types attach themselves to the cell membrane of the bacterium and instill a charge of DNA into the cytoplasm. DNA carries the genetic code of the virus, so that rapid multiplication of the virus takes place inside the bacterium. The growing viruses act as parasites, using the metabolism of the bacterial cell for growth and development. Eventually the bacterial cell bursts, releasing many more viruses capable of destroying similar bacteria. Called also bacterial virus. adj., adj bacteriopha´gic.

With some bacteria, notably those of the Streptococcus family, infection by certain phages can dramatically alter pathogenicity, converging previously innocuous microbes into deadly pathogenic strains. The so-called “flesh-eating” viruses are a striking example. They are relatively harmless bacteria until new geletic material is incorporated via a phage or plasmid.
temperate bacteriophage one whose genetic material (prophage) becomes an intimate part of the bacterial genome, persisting and being reproduced through many cell division cycles; the affected bacterial cell is known as a lysogenic bacterium.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

bac·te·ri·o·phage

(bak-tēr'ē-ō-fāj), Avoid the mispronunciation bak-te'rē-ō-fahzh. Avoid the misspelling and mispronunciation bacterialphage.
A virus with specific affinity for bacteria. Bacteriophages have been found in association with nearly all groups of bacteria, including the Cyanobacteria; like other viruses they contain either (but never both) RNA or DNA and vary in structure from the seemingly simple filamentous bacterial virus to relatively complex forms with contractile "tails"; their relationships to the host bacteria are highly specific and, as in the case of temperate bacteriophage, may be genetically intimate. Bacteriophages are named after the bacterial species, group, or strain for which they are specific, for example, corynebacteriophage, coliphage; a number of families are recognized and have been assigned provisional names: Corticoviridae, Cystoviridae, Fuselloviridae, Inoviridae, Leviviridae, Lipothrixviridae, Microviridae, Myoviridae, Plasmaviridae, Podoviridae, Styloviridae, and Tectiviridae.
See also: coliphage.
Synonym(s): phage
[bacterio- + G. phagō, to eat]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

phage

(fāj)
n.
A bacteriophage.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

bac·te·ri·o·phage

(bak-tēr'ē-ō-fāj)
A virus with specific affinity for bacteria. Bacteriophages have been found in essentially all groups of bacteria; like other viruses they contain either RNA or DNA (but never both) and vary in structure from simple to complex; their relationships to host bacteria are specific and may be genetically intimate. Bacteriophages are named after the bacterial species, group, or strain for which they are specific, e.g., corynebacteriophage, coliphage.
See also: coliphage
Synonym(s): phage.
[bacterio- + G. phagō, to eat]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

phage

A BACTERIOPHAGE.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

phage

see BACTERIOPHAGE.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

bac·te·ri·o·phage

(bak-tēr'ē-ō-fāj)
A virus with specific affinity for bacteria; found in essentially all groups of bacteria; like other viruses, they contain either RNA or DNA (but never both) and vary in structure from simple to complex; their relationships to host bacteria are specific and may be genetically intimate.
Synonym(s): phage.
[bacterio- + G. phagō, to eat]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Announced a publication in the peer-reviewed journal Infection detailing a case study in which a cystic fibrosis patient was successfully treated for a multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection with the Company's natural phage product, AP-PA01.
The researchers decided to "swap" these two phages and see if they could cross-infect the other person's isolated bacteria.
Recently, teenager Isabelle Carnell-Holdaway, who was fighting a serious infection with a resistant bug, was helped by "phage" therapy, which might be a powerful tool in fighting bacterial resistance.
Phages, the most abundant biological grouping on earth, are a category of viruses that are able to infect bacteria.
They suggested that merely the protection of a bacteriophage lysate from evaporation and bacterial contamination suffices to maintain phage titer with the passage of time during storage.
As shown in Figure 3, we performed fine genomic comparisons of the Stx phages from PV15-279 with the Stx1a, Stx2a, and Stx2c phages from other STEC O157:H7 strains used in the phylogenetic analysis shown in Figure 2 (phages were included only when complete sequences were available).
When inflammation occurs, researchers found that phage communities change randomly leading to a genetic signature indicative of the inflammatory environment.
Locus is the world leader in CRISPR-engineered phage therapeutics, uniquely leveraging the powerful Type I CRISPR-Cas3 system to specifically destroy the DNA of target bacteria cells, quickly killing them.
A unique treatment known as phage therapy uses bacteriophages to selectively reduce harmful bacteria, making way for beneficial probiotic organisms to flourish.
When the former USSR opened up to the West, physicians in the United States and Europe learned the Eliava Institute was one of the few places in the world where researchers were still studying and administering phages. That was fortunate timing, because antibiotics in the West were losing their power under the onslaught of antibiotic resistance.