phacoemulsification

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phacoemulsification

 [fak″o-e-mul″sĭ-fĭ-ka´shun]
a technique of cataract extraction, utilizing high-frequency ultrasonic vibrations to fragment the lens combined with controlled irrigation to maintain normal pressure in the anterior chamber, and suction to remove lens fragments and irrigating fluid.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

phac·o·e·mul·si·fi·ca·tion

(fak'ō-ē-mŭl'si-fi-kā'shŭn),
A method of emulsifying and aspirating a cataract with a low-frequency ultrasonic needle.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

phacoemulsification

(făk′ō-ĭ-mŭl′sə-fĭ-kā′shən)
n.
Removal of a cataract by emulsifying the lens ultrasonically.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

phacoemulsification

Ophthalmology The therapeutic dissolution or emulsification of a cataract by ultrasound with subsequent removal. See Cataract.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

phac·o·e·mul·si·fi·ca·tion

, phakoemulsification (fak'ō-ē-mŭl-si-fi-kā'shŭn)
A method of emulsifying and aspirating a cataract with a low-frequency ultrasonic needle.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Phacoemulsification

Surgical procedure to remove a cataract using sound waves to disintegrate the lens which is then removed by suction.
Mentioned in: Cataracts
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

phacoemulsification 

Procedure for removal of the crystalline lens in cataract surgery, which consists of emulsifying and aspirating the contents of the lens with the use of a low-frequency ultrasonic needle inserted into the eye near the limbus. This technique usually produces more rapid wound healing and early stabilization of refractive error with less astigmatism, due to the small incision. However, this technique may damage the corneal endothelium if excessive ultrasound is used. Following removal of the lens cortex and nucleus, an intraocular lens may be implanted within the remaining lens capsule. The lens is folded and inserted through a small incision (e.g. 3.2 mm) using a special injector. This procedure is preferred over other cataract extraction techniques due to both the rapid wound healing and the lower incidence of potentially vision threatening side effects (e.g. retinal detachment). See after-cataract; biometry of the eye; cataract extraction; intraocular lens; iridectomy.
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann