Haemophilus influenzae

(redirected from Pfeiffer's bacillus)

Hae·moph·i·lus in·flu·en·'zae

Avoid the misspelling H. influenza and the jargonistic abridgment H. flu.
a bacterial species found in the respiratory tract that causes acute respiratory infections, including pneumonia, acute conjunctivitis, otitis, and purulent meningitis in children (in adults in whom it contributes to sinusitis and chronic bronchitis). Originally considered to be the cause of influenza, it is the type species of the genus Haemophilus.

Hae·moph·i·lus in·flu·en·zae

(hē-mof'i-lŭs in-flū-en'zē)
A bacterial species found in the respiratory tract that causes acute respiratory infections including pneumonia, acute conjunctivitis, bacterial meningitis, and purulent meningitis in children, rarely in adults; originally considered to be the cause of influenza, it is the type species of the genus Haemophilus.
Synonym(s): Pfeiffer bacillus, Weeks bacillus.

Hae·moph·i·lus in·flu·en·zae

(hē-mof'i-lŭs in-flū-en'zē)
Bacterial species found in the respiratory tract that causes acute respiratory infections, including pneumonia and otitis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Debate over the exact role of Pfeiffer's bacillus would continue throughout the pandemic.
Though some British medical professionals still clung to the idea that Pfeiffer's bacillus was the actual cause of influenza, by the second wave, most had at least some doubt as to its actual role, and many believed that a still undiscovered organism was actually to blame.
They could not deny that Pfeiffer's bacillus was present in influenza infections; however, they believed that a filter passer paved the way for Pfeiffer's bacillus, causing the initial infection and then being destroyed by subsequent infections (Collie 1933.
(27) A good example of this problem can be found in the great effort undertaken to base treatment on Pfeiffer's bacillus, discovered during the pandemic of the early 1890s, and asserted by the discoverer, Richard Pfeiffer, to be the cause of influenza.
If Pfeiffer's bacillus was the causal agent then it would be the basis for a vaccine, but pneumocci and streptococci were also commonly found in influenza cases.