Pfannenstiel incision


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Pfan·nen·stiel in·ci·sion

(fahn'ĕn-shtēl),
an incision made transversely, and through the external sheath of the recti muscles, about 1 inch above the pubes, the muscles being separated at the midline in the direction of their fibers.

Pfannenstiel incision

Surgery A transverse curved abdominal incision with downward convexity, above the symphysis pubis; the PI passes through the skin, superficial fascia, and aponeurosis, and exposes the pyramidalis and rectus muscles, which are separated at the midline, after which the peitoneum is opened vertically Used for Abdominal hysterectomy

Pfan·nen·stiel in·ci·sion

(fahn'ĕn-shtēl in-sizh'ŭn)
An incision made transversely, and through the external sheath of the recti muscles, about an inch above the pubes, the muscles being separated at the midline in the direction of their fibers.

Pfannenstiel,

Hermann Johann, German gynecologist, 1862-1909.
Pfannenstiel incision - an incision made transversely and through the external sheath of the recti muscles, about an inch above the pubes.
Pfannenstiel transverse approach
References in periodicals archive ?
The Pfannenstiel incision, first described by Hermann Johannes Pfannenstiel in the late 19th century, was devised to limit the incidence of incisional hernia that was seen in midline laparotomies.
For this patient with persistent focal left-lower quadrant pain and a defined trigger point near her Pfannenstiel incision, consider anesthetic injection in the left lower quadrant.
Recurrent Pfannenstiel surgery has previously been found to be a predictor of chronic pain after Pfannenstiel incision (18), but our results do not support such as association.
INTRODUCTION: Total abdominal hysterectomy is commonly performed via a Pfannenstiel incision and causes moderate to severe pain, which is often multifactorial and can be attributed to combination of incision pain, pain from deeper visceral structures, and dynamic pain on movement, such as during straining, coughing or mobilizing that may be severe (1).
Make an 8- to 10-cm Pfannenstiel incision approximately 3 to 5 cm above the pubic bone, carry the dissection down to the level of the rectus fascia using a combination of electrocautery and blunt dissection, and sweep the fat and subcutaneous tissue clear of the rectus tissue (FIGURE 1, page 26).
Of the 504 patients with adhesions, 62% had a prior abdominal wall incision, 22% had a prior Pfannenstiel incision, and 16% had a prior laparoscopic incision.
Repeat Pfannenstiel incision through previous scar was made to enter the abdominal cavity.
A Pfannenstiel incision was used, and the procedure involved removal of the uterus, cervix, upper quarter of the vagina, pelvic lymph nodes, and surrounding tissue.
When dealing with a large fibroid uterus, not wanting to use a vertical skin incision and hoping to limit the size of a Pfannenstiel incision, it can be difficult to elevate the uterus out of the incision to start a hysterectomy or myomectomy.
In general, a Pfannenstiel incision is associated with less postoperative discomfort, allowing earlier mobilization and better respiratory function.
In the procedure, the bladder is first instilled with a mixture of normal saline and indigo carmine, and a Pfannenstiel incision is made into the abdominal cavity.