thorax

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thorax

 [thor´aks]
the part of the body between the neck and abdomen; it is separated from the abdomen by the diaphragm. Its walls are formed by the 12 pairs of ribs, attached to the sides of the spine and curving toward the front. The principal organs in the thoracic cavity are the heart with its major blood vessels and the lungs with the bronchi, which bring in the body's air supply. The trachea enters the thorax to connect with the lungs, and the esophagus travels through it to connect with the stomach below the diaphragm. See also thoracic surgery. Called also chest and pectus.

tho·rax

, gen.

tho·ra·cis

, pl.

tho·ra·ces

(thō'raks, thō-rā'sis, -rā'sēz), [TA]
The upper part of the trunk between the neck and the abdomen; formed by the 12 thoracic vertebrae, the 12 pairs of ribs, the sternum, and the muscles and fasciae attached to these; below, it is separated from the abdomen by the diaphragm; it contains the chief organs of the circulatory and respiratory systems.
[L. fr. G. thōrax, breastplate, the chest, fr. thōrēssō, to arm]

thorax

/tho·rax/ (thor´aks) pl. tho´races   [Gr.] chest; the part of the body between the neck and diaphragm, encased by the ribs.
Peyrot's thorax  an obliquely oval thorax associated with massive pleural effusions.

thorax

(thôr′ăks′)
n. pl. thoraxes or thoraces (thôr′ə-sēz′)
1. The part of the human body between the neck and the diaphragm, partially encased by the ribs and containing the heart and lungs; the chest.
2. A part in other vertebrates that corresponds to the human thorax.
3. The second or middle region of the body of certain arthropods, including the insects and most crustaceans, lying between the head and the abdomen.

thorax

[thôr′aks] pl. thoraxes, thoraces
Etymology: Gk, chest
the upper part of the trunk or cage of bone and cartilage containing the principal organs of respiration and circulation and covering part of the abdominal organs. It is formed ventrally by the sternum and costal cartilages and dorsally by the 12 thoracic vertebrae and the dorsal parts of the 12 ribs. The thorax of women has less capacity, a shorter sternum, and more movable upper ribs than that of men. Also called chest. thoracic, adj.
enlarge picture
Thorax

thorax

The region between the neck and abdomen, which contains the heart, lungs (and the various veins, arteries, valves and tubules needed for their maintenance and functionality), thymus and oesophagus.

tho·rax

, pl. thoraces (thō'raks, thō-rā'sēz) [TA]
The upper part of the trunk between the neck and the abdomen; it is formed by the 12 thoracic vertebrae, the 12 pairs of ribs, the sternum, and the muscles and fasciae attached to these; below, it is separated from the abdomen by the diaphragm; it contains the chief organs of the circulatory and respiratory systems.
[L. fr. G. thōrax, breastplate, the chest, fr. thōrēssō, to arm]

thorax

The part of the trunk between the neck and the ABDOMEN. The thorax contains a central compartment, the MEDIASTINUM that contains the heart and separates the two lungs. The thorax also contains the TRACHEA, the OESOPHAGUS, a number of large arteries and veins connected to the heart. Its walls consist of the dorsal VERTEBRA, the breastbone (sternum) and the rib cage.

thorax

  1. (in vertebrates) that part of the body which contains the lungs and heart, and which in mammals is divided from the abdomen by the DIAPHRAGM.
  2. (in ARTHROPODS) that part of the body directly behind the head and in front of the abdomen which, in insects, consists of three segments bearing the legs and wings.

Thorax

The chest area, which runs between the abdomen and neck and is encased in the ribs.
Mentioned in: Chest X Ray
Figure 1: Ascending nerve pathways and proprioceptive reflex arcs, represented in diagrammatic sections of the brain and spinal cord. Shown on the right: those serving the sensations listed. Shown on the left: reflex pathways for skeletal muscle control. (A) From a muscle spindle, to a synapse with an alpha motor neuron, and a branch to the brain. (B) From a tendon organ, inhibitory branch (broken line) to an alpha motor neuron, and a branch to the brain.

thorax

the chest. thoracic cage the framework (ribs, costal cartilages, sternum and thoracic vertebrae) which protects the internal thoracic structures (especially lungs and heart) and provides attachment for muscles. Traumatic damage in sport can range from local discomfort to fractured ribs and potential damage to the lungs and, rarely, the heart. The liver and spleen, although not in the thorax, are also protected by the lower ribs and can be damaged by their injury. See also pneumothorax; Figure 1.

thorax

chest, i.e. upper part of trunk, between neck and abdomen; encased by the ribs and containing the heart and lungs

thorax (thōrˑ·aks),

n part of the human anatomy that comprises the chamber between the diaphragm and the neck.
Enlarge picture
Thorax.

tho·rax

, pl. thoraces (thō'raks, thō-rā'sēz) [TA]
Upper part of trunk between neck and abdomen; formed by 12 thoracic vertebrae, 12 pairs of ribs, sternum, and muscles and fasciae attached to these.
[L. fr. G. thōrax, breastplate, the chest, fr. thōrēssō, to arm]

thorax

the part of the body between the neck and abdomen; the chest. It is separated from the abdomen by the diaphragm. The walls of the thorax are formed by pairs of ribs, attached to the sides of the spine and curving toward the sternum. The cranial pairs of ribs are attached to the sternum, the next few connect with cartilage connected to the sternum and often the last one or two (the floating ribs) are unattached distally. The cavity of the thorax is divided by a thick partition, the mediastinum. The principal organs in the thoracic cavity are the heart with its major blood vessels, and the lungs with the bronchi. The trachea enters the thorax to connect with the lungs, and the esophagus travels through it to connect with the stomach caudal to the diaphragm. See also thoracic.

Patient discussion about thorax

Q. My mother had a chest pain and she was sent for a TEE. When do you need a TEE and when a normal echo is fine? My mother had a chest pain few weeks ago. we were sure its a heart attack and went to the ER. There the doctors did some tests and she was sent for a (trans thoracic echocardiogram) TEE. I want to know when do you need a TEE and when you can do just a normal echocardiogram because the TEE was very painful for her and we want to know if ther was a better way.

A. The main difference between TEE and normal echo is that in TEE u put the transducer directly in the esophagus. The transducer is the same and the idea is to put it as close as possible to the heart.
As far as I know there are some heart situations the TEE is better for diagnosis that normal echo. Maybe your mom had one of those situations?
I can recommend you to ask the ER doctor. he will probably be able to give a better explanation for his choice

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