Peyer's patches


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Peyer's patches

one of a group of solitary nodules or groups of lymph nodes forming a single layer in the mucous membrane of the ileum opposite the mesenteric attachment. They are oval patches about 1 cm wide that extend for about 4 cm along the intestine. In most individuals they appear in the distal ileum, but they also appear in the jejunum of a few individuals.

Peyer's patches

oval, elevated patches of closely packed lymph follicles in mucous and submucous layers of the small intestine. Called also aggregated lymphatic nodules.

continuous Peyer's patches
found in the terminal ileum in calves, lambs, piglets. Thought to be a primary site for B-cell generation; involute with age.
References in periodicals archive ?
In our study, DogCV DNA was detected in lymphoid tissues, including Peyer's patches, even for dogs 3 and 4, where no clinical or histologic enteric lesions were detectable.
It is also speculated that the formation of immune complexes of pectic polysaccharide-reacting natural IgA antibody with the active pectic polysaccharides in the intestinal fluid may not only participate in incorporation of the active pectic polysaccharides into Peyer's patches but also activate complement components in the fluid to result in certain modulations of the intestinal immune system.
Selective adherence of IgA to murine Peyer's patches M cells: evidence for a novel IgA receptor.
Peyer's patches, the lymphoid bodies that surround the lumen of the small and large intestines, can be damaged by antibiotics and environmental toxins over a lifetime and may not produce enough T cells.
Lymphocytes in the intestinal mucosa such as Peyer's patches are eliminated from the mucosa and migrated through the mesentric lymph nodes to reach systemic circulation to regulate defense system of the other mucosal sites like upper respiratory tract as well as regulates systemic immune response (McGhee et al.
Salmonella typhimurium initiates murine infection by penetrating and destroying the specialized epithelial M cells of the Peyer's patches.
Gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) is represented by Peyer's patches (think about beefing up Peyer's patches with Rebas, from Pleo Sanum--MG), tonsils, mesenteric lymph nodes, and appendix.
Although integrins are not present on the apical surface of enterocytes, they are located on the apical surface of microfold cells found in Peyer's patches along the intestinal lumen (18).