Petri dish culture

Petri dish culture

(pē'trē),
a combination of filter paper, fecal specimen, and tap water placed in a Petri dish; provides an environment in which nematode eggs may hatch and larvae develop.

Pe·tri dish cul·ture

(pē'trē dish kŭl'chŭr)
A combination of filter paper, fecal specimen, and tap water placed in a Petri dish; provides an environment for nematode eggs to hatch and larvae to develop.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Animals and humans are complex living beings, which no computer or petri dish culture can fully mimic.
Ceratopteris richardii Petri dish cultures were established on nutrient agar following Hickok and Warne (2004) using wild type C.
Classically, what we know about the workings of the human nervous system has come largely from studies of different toxins on the function of model systems, such as in this case, the action of hoiamide A on nerve cells in petri dish cultures," said principal co-investigators William Gerwick.