petiole

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Related to Petioles: phyllode

petiole

 [pet´e-ōl]
a stem, stalk, or pedicle.
epiglottic petiole the pointed lower end of the epiglottic cartilage, attached to the thyroid cartilage.

pe·ti·o·lus

(pe-tī'ō-lŭs), Avoid the mispronunciation petio'lus.
A stem or pedicle.
Synonym(s): petiole
[L. dim. of pes (foot), the stalk of a fruit]

petiole

(pĕt′ē-ōl′)
n.
Zoology A slender, stalklike part, as that connecting the thorax and abdomen in certain insects.

pet′i·oled′ adj.

petiole

the stalk of a leaf, containing vascular tissue which connects with the VASCULAR BUNDLES of the stem. The base of a petiole, where it joins the stem, may have small leaflike structures called STIPULES and axillary buds. see AXIL.
References in periodicals archive ?
For phytomass production, water salinity had significant effect (p < 0.01) on petiole dry phytomass (PDP) and leaf dry phytomass (LDP), and there were no differences among the levels of manure or even effect of the interaction between factors on any of the variables (Table 3).
The values of Na:Ca ratio of leaves, stem + petiole, and absorption roots were higher for plants cultivated under salt stress (Figure 2B).
Branches without persistent spinules, petioles [+ or -] smooth, 1(--2) mm wide, leaves 2-3.5(-5) cm wide, calyx lobes oblong, 4-5 mm long, appressed pubescent on both surfaces, petal apices not reflexed, anthers rounded ...
For plants grown without salt stress (control plants), the highest sodium ([Na.sup.+]) concentration was observed in the absorption roots (AR) and the lowest in the stem + petiole (Figure 1).
0.5 mm long, caducous on the old parts, intense on the young branches, distributed on the branches, stipules, petioles, rachis, leaflets, inflorescences, bracts, pedicels, margin with sepals and abaxial surface with the petals.
Completely randomized design was used with 4 factorial (2 x 5 x 3 x 2) (Medium: MS x B5, TDZ 5 concentrations x Explants: petiole, leaf, node x Source of explants: field, in vitro) shoot regeneration experiment.
Both cultivations in water showed same diameter of the petioles and stems (Figures 11 and 12), while smaller diameters were found in the soil cultivation (Figure 13).
Observed measurement ranges for the quantitative characters revealed that LBL, LBW and petiole length were most significant at P<0.01 (Table 5).
Two of these (1 active and 1 abandoned) were located on the petiole of Euphorbia cotinifolia L.
Leaves opposite, decussate, equal in a pair, evenly spaced; petiole 0.6-2.2 cm long, terete in cross-section, with a pair of glands at base of petiole, glabrous, covered with a dense clusters of scales (more evident when dry); blade ovate to elliptic, 9-27 x 5-12 cm, coriaceous, green adaxially, light green abaxially, apex acuminate, base cuneate to rounded, sometimes oblique, margin with scattered small teeth, glabrous adaxially, glabrate and with minute punctations abaxially, 4-5 pairs of main lateral veins, higher order of venation only evident abaxially.
Percent Dry Weight N P K Mg Ca Bloom petioles Irrigated 1.24 0.59 1.11 0.32 1.73 Non-irrigated 1.14 0.54 0.93 0.32 1.71 Significance* * * ns ns ns Veraison petioles Irrigated 0.49 0.21 1.20 0.85 3.85 Non-irrigated 0.43 0.14 0.71 0.91 3.56 Significance* ns * * ns * Harvest petioles Irrigated 0.42 0.12 0.70 1.00 4.51 Non-irrigated 0.45 0.11 0.22 1.08 4.33 Significance* ns ns ** ns ns Veraison leaf laminae Irrigated 1.82 0.18 0.70 0.60 3.30 Non-irrigated 1.81 0.13 0.52 0.58 3.09 Significance* ns * * ns * Ns, * Non-significant and significant at P < 0.05 level Table 1.