pesticide

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pesticide

 [pes´tĭ-sīd]
a poison used to destroy pests of any sort.

pes·ti·cide

(pes'ti-sīd),
General term for an agent that destroys fungi, insects, rodents, or any other pest.

pesticide

(pĕs′tĭ-sīd′)
n.
A substance or agent used to kill pests, such as unwanted or harmful insects, rodents, or weeds.

pes′ti·cid′al (-sīd′l) adj.

pesticide

Toxicology An annihilator of ambient arachnids, antagonistic arthropods, abominable animacules or pugnacious plants–eg, fumigants, fungicides, herbicides, insecticides; most are toxic and potentially fatal, with high arsenical or organophosphate content, and store in adipose tissue, given their lipid solubility Types Organochlorines-eg, DDT, chlordane, mirex, organophosphates–eg, parathion, diazinon, carbamates–eg, Aldicarb, carbaryl, carbofuran, metals–eg, copper, tributyl-tin oxide, pyrethroids–eg, permethrin, cypermethrin, etc–eg, 2,4-D, atrazine, paraquat. See Intermediate syndrome, Organophosphate pesticide.

pes·ti·cide

(pes'ti-sīd)
General term for an agent that destroys fungi, insects, rodents, or any other pest.

pesticide

any agent that causes the death of a pest. The general definition is usually restricted to chemicals with pesticidal properties, such as herbicides, insecticides, acaricides and fungicides. Pesticide application can produce many problems, for example:
  1. (a) destruction of organisms useful to man (‘nontarget’ species).
  2. (b) directly harmful effects to man if used incorrectly
  3. (c) accumulation and concentration in food chains leading to toxicity in animals at a higher TROPHIC LEVEL.

pesticide

a poison used to destroy pests of any sort. See arsenical, carbamates, chlorinated hydrocarbons, organophosphorus compound, pyrethroids.

pesticide poisoning
pesticides are selective poisons chosen for use because of their relative safety for humans and animals. It is likely that they will poison these species if they are used in sufficient quantity or in special circumstances, for example when the water intake of the subject animals is limited.
pesticide resistance
continued use of a single agent, or a group of closely allied agents, can cause selective survival of insects with innate tolerance of the agent and lead to the development of a resistant population.
pesticide tissue residues
some pesticides have had to be withdrawn from use because of their persistence in the tissues of animals including humans. The passage of the agent in the milk of the animal is a comparable problem.
References in periodicals archive ?
Having a greater number of crops or livestock enterprises (CROPTOT) had a positive and significant impact on the adoption of seven individual BMPs, as expected: Critical Area Planting, Field Borders and Filter Strips, Grassed Waterways, Livestock Exclusion, Riparian Forest Buffer, Nutrient Management and Pesticide Management.
She hopes that her current and future studies and outreach education such as Cornell Cooperative Extension's Personal Protective Equipment Program and its Pesticide Management and Education Program will help to bridge the often differing points of view of farmers and regulators.
Similarly, the conversion of the pesticide management policy has altered the content and intent of the original policy.
This would provide a baseline to assist in developing strategies to strengthen the capacity for pesticide management in WHO member states.
Adoption rates of nutrient and pesticide management were 69 and 62 percent, respectively.
Corrective measures are urgently needed for pesticide management," says Gelinas.
Quebec has adopted a landmark Pesticide Management Code, which strictly regulates the storage, sales and use of pesticides in the province.
It also allows us to demonstrate good pesticide management to the EPA and showcase our industry to the public.
But today's important public debates over how best to achieve it often ring chords of uncertainty about the future of pesticide management research.
Baker will provide environmental compliance services in areas that include, but are not limited to, petroleum storage tanks, oil spill preparedness and planning, waste management, environmental condition of property programs, sustainability services, Clean Air Act, Safe Drinking Water Act, Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plans and Clean Water Act, wastewater plans and studies, laboratory services, pesticide management, and radon.
In Missouri, surface runoff control practices and a pesticide management plan that includes pesticide incorporation or the use of low-rate pesticides can be of assistance.
Most of the public health and environmental protection organizations who made presentations to the Commons Standing Committee -- in particular the Canadian Institute of Child Health, the Learning Disabilities Association of Canada, the World Wildlife Fund, the Canadian Environmental Law Association and the Ontario College of Family Physicians -- denounced the Canadian pesticide management system because it does not specifically address the vulnerability of children, and emphasized the importance of correcting this deficiency.

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