pesticide

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pesticide

 [pes´tĭ-sīd]
a poison used to destroy pests of any sort.

pes·ti·cide

(pes'ti-sīd),
General term for an agent that destroys fungi, insects, rodents, or any other pest.

pesticide

(pĕs′tĭ-sīd′)
n.
A substance or agent used to kill pests, such as unwanted or harmful insects, rodents, or weeds.

pes′ti·cid′al (-sīd′l) adj.

pesticide

Toxicology An annihilator of ambient arachnids, antagonistic arthropods, abominable animacules or pugnacious plants–eg, fumigants, fungicides, herbicides, insecticides; most are toxic and potentially fatal, with high arsenical or organophosphate content, and store in adipose tissue, given their lipid solubility Types Organochlorines-eg, DDT, chlordane, mirex, organophosphates–eg, parathion, diazinon, carbamates–eg, Aldicarb, carbaryl, carbofuran, metals–eg, copper, tributyl-tin oxide, pyrethroids–eg, permethrin, cypermethrin, etc–eg, 2,4-D, atrazine, paraquat. See Intermediate syndrome, Organophosphate pesticide.

pes·ti·cide

(pes'ti-sīd)
General term for an agent that destroys fungi, insects, rodents, or any other pest.

pesticide

any agent that causes the death of a pest. The general definition is usually restricted to chemicals with pesticidal properties, such as herbicides, insecticides, acaricides and fungicides. Pesticide application can produce many problems, for example:
  1. (a) destruction of organisms useful to man (‘nontarget’ species).
  2. (b) directly harmful effects to man if used incorrectly
  3. (c) accumulation and concentration in food chains leading to toxicity in animals at a higher TROPHIC LEVEL.

pesticide

a poison used to destroy pests of any sort. See arsenical, carbamates, chlorinated hydrocarbons, organophosphorus compound, pyrethroids.

pesticide poisoning
pesticides are selective poisons chosen for use because of their relative safety for humans and animals. It is likely that they will poison these species if they are used in sufficient quantity or in special circumstances, for example when the water intake of the subject animals is limited.
pesticide resistance
continued use of a single agent, or a group of closely allied agents, can cause selective survival of insects with innate tolerance of the agent and lead to the development of a resistant population.
pesticide tissue residues
some pesticides have had to be withdrawn from use because of their persistence in the tissues of animals including humans. The passage of the agent in the milk of the animal is a comparable problem.
References in periodicals archive ?
Even though spray pesticides are now labeled and 28 states have drift spray regulations on their books, pesticide drift continues to be a problem wherever crops are grown.
But the panelists also agreed that major challenges still lie ahead on making pesticide drift reduction recommendations to the Agency.
In Oregon, there is not a shred of protection against pesticide drift for our endangered organic farming operations.
The apps are designed to ensure that aerial and ground-based crews can hit targets and minimize pesticide drift by keying in specifics on the type of equipment and pesticide they are using.
Pesticides are widely used in agriculture, and off-target pesticide drift (i.
Spatial tests of the pesticide drift, habitat destruction, UVB and Climate change hypothesis for California amphibian declines.
receive up to 35 percent of their estimated lifetime dose of some carcinogenic pesticides by age five through food, contaminated drinking water, household use, and pesticide drift.
The US Forest Service has developed computer models to predict pesticide drift for agricultural applications (ie, crop dusting).
Pesticide Action Network North America: Secondhand Pesticides: Airborne Pesticide Drift in California.
It can help extension educators and farmers choose equipment, settings, and techniques to minimize pesticide drift and aid manufacturers in formulating pesticides and selecting spray equipment to minimize their products' drift potential.
The authors recommend that schools adopt strategies to reduce the use of pesticides and prevent pesticide drift onto school grounds from farmland.
In the brave new high-tech world of bio-engineered crops, like the Monsanto potato that secretes its own pesticide, it seems we needn't worry ourselves about poisoned farmworkers, pesticide drift, and children munching on toxic apples.

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