personal unconscious


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personal unconscious

in jungian psychology, the more superficial layer of the unconscious in which complexes reside.
See also: collective unconscious, complex (3).

personal unconscious

(in analytic psychology) the thoughts, ideas, emotions, and other mental phenomena acquired and repressed during one's lifetime. Compare collective unconscious.
References in periodicals archive ?
Just as there is a constant inter play between complexes and archetypes, there is an inter play between the personal unconscious and the collective unconscious.
We also know that Jung qualified Freud's unconscious as 'personal', proposing, as an extension to the personal unconscious, what he called a 'collective' unconscious.
The personal unconscious is a term used by Jung to refer to experiences memories and thought that slip out of consciousness.
For Jung, the human psyche consists of three parts: the personal conscious, personal unconscious, and collective unconscious The personal conscious and personal unconscious comprise the individual psyche.
These can be found in the dark area which corresponds with Jung's personal unconscious theory.
Campbell supports Jung's distinction between personal and collective unconscious and further distinguishes between personal recollections or reflections as images rising from the personal unconscious, and the "imagery of myths" rising from the collective.
Dream interpretation in Islam is a spiritual way of divining the future and submitting oneself to the personal unconscious and the will of Allah.
The first of the two layers was the personal unconscious.
More common than big dreams, little dreams come from the personal unconscious and are often a reflection of day-to-day activity.
Freud's idea of a personal unconscious, and of a distinctively individual constellation of sexual wishes that first take shape in relation to one's parents, resonated with still broader currents.
These also liminal figures represent his shadow, his personal unconscious threatening to reveal itself.
However, although Jung says that the shadow belongs to the personal unconscious, it can also be experienced as a collective image, and is therefore archetypal.

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