self

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self

 [self]
1. a term used to denote an animal's own antigenic constituents, in contrast to “nonself” (which denotes foreign antigenic constituents). The self constituents are metabolized without antibody formation, whereas the antigens that are nonself are eliminated through the immune response mechanism. It has been postulated that there is a mechanism of “self recognition” that enables the organism to distinguish between self and nonself. See also immunity.
2. the complete being of an individual, comprising both physical and psychological characteristics, and including both conscious and unconscious components. The concept of self is central to the jungian personality theory. See also Jung.
therapeutic use of self the ability to use theory, experiential knowledge, and self-awareness, and to explore one's impact on others.

self

autophobia.

self

(self),
1. A sum of the attitudes, feelings, memories, traits, and behavioral predispositions that make up the personality.
2. The individual person as represented in his or her own awareness and in his or her environment.
3. A generalized, everyday term for ego or persona.
4. In immunology, an individual's autologous cell components as contrasted with non-self, or foreign, constituents; the basic mechanism underlying recognition of self from non-self is unknown, but serves to protect the host from an immunologic attack on the host's own antigenic constituents, as opposed to immune system destruction or elimination of foreign antigens.

self

(sĕlf)
n. pl. selves
1. The total, essential, or particular being of a person; the individual.
2. One's consciousness of one's own being or identity; the ego.
3. That which the immune system identifies as belonging to the body.

self

Immunology
adjective Referring to one’s own immune system; autologous.

self

(self)
1. A sum of the attitudes, feelings, memories, traits, and behavioral predispositions that make up the personality.
2. The person as represented in his or her own awareness and in his or her environment.
3. immunology A person's autologous cell components as contrasted with nonself, or foreign, constituents. The mechanism of recognition of self from nonself is unknown, but serves to protect from an immunologic attack on the host's own antigenic constituents, as opposed to immune system destruction or elimination of foreign antigens.
References in periodicals archive ?
Results of Pearson product moment correlation indicated non- significant correlation between Personal self concept, Family self concept and Social self concept while significant inter correlation among Family, Social and Total self concept.
A person becomes a personal self insofar as he comes to be an independent and integral individual in action.
Reflex response, for example, is not a response to external stimuli by a personal self functioning as an organized individual under normal circumstances--although reflexes are, indeed, highly useful mechanisms of behavior, embedded within the individual by nature or culture, and available to elicit responses under special (perhaps immediately threatening) conditions.
Similarly, acting as a personal self requires that isolated, internal causalities not dominate what one does either.
The normally functioning personal self, on the other hand, should be thought of as a psycho-physical whole, a (largely if never completely) unified process of activity, all of whose subprocesses modify one another in some measure--one in which all mental and physical states are interconnected, all mental states in some measure physically embodied, and all bodily states in some measure psychically significant and expressive.
A person constitutes himself as a personal self in interplay with other beings.
We can see the personal self, then, as a structured constellation of thus far developed ways of dealing with other people and with things.
The students' self concept increased in the areas of physical self, moral ethical self, personal self, social self, identity, self satisfaction, and behavior.

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