diary

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diary

A personal record kept by a patient or caregiver of important outpatient observations, e.g., blood pressures; blood glucose levels; caloric intake; or the frequency of certain symptoms, such as bowel movements, crying spells, headaches, palpitations, or urination.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
Blogs aren't limited to personal journals. In some cases, a blog can be a collective commentary or a work in progress on a topic or an event (as ours was).
On February 12, 1945, at precisely 3:20 p.m., noted African American intellectual and writer Richard Wright sat down at his desk in New York City and, true to his disciplined regimen, wrote the following in his personal journal:
John Muir, the great conservationist and father of America's national parks, claims that there is an even "deeper stewardship." He wrote in his personal journal that we are faithful stewards of creation simply because it belongs to God.
Studies have shown that people with asthma, cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, or insomnia have benefited from keeping a personal journal.
Although personal journal writing has been long recognized as a means of facilitating reflective thought, according to Richardson (1993) there is little agreement on the nature and measurement of such concepts.
While press coverage of the Journal's changes focused on its plans to redo the front page, the use of color on Page One as well as throughout the paper and its new three-day-a-week Personal Journal section, the word to the agency was to emphasize "an enhanced and expanded paper."
Also, the Journal has created a new consumer-oriented daily inside section called Personal Journal, which appears Tuesdays through Thursdays, Mondays being given over to special theme sections and Fridays to the Weekend Journal.
There'd be articles not only about business but a new section, Personal Journal, addressing the business of life with consumer-oriented features.
The article closes with some observations about patterns of women's diary-keeping, pointing out that historians should have been more skeptical about any document claiming to be a personal journal penned by seventeenth-century American woman.
This is Elizabeth Luther's personal journal, documenting her visit to a variety of churches, mosques, and other buildings of a religious nature.
An electronic edition of The Wall Street Journal and a related customized onscreen service called Personal Journal are also available.

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