Persian cat

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Related to Persian: Persian Empire, Persian cat

Persian cat

the traditional longhaired cat with a broad head, short nose and cobby body, medium to large size, with short legs. A variety of colors are seen in the coat and eyes. Also known as Angora, although originally that was a type with finer, satiny coat, or simply as longhair.
References in classic literature ?
The Persian was equally captivated by Noureddin, and said to herself: "The vizir does me too great honour in buying me for the king.
Some time having elapsed, on account of the long journey, since the beautiful Persian had been to the bath, five or six days after her purchase the vizir's wife gave orders that the bath should be heated for her, and that her own female slaves should attend her there, and after-wards should array her in a magnificent dress that had been prepared for her.
Her toilet completed, the beautiful Persian came to present herself to the vizir's wife, who hardly recognised her, so greatly was her beauty increased.
Acting forthwith on this decision she ordered two little slaves during her absence to watch over the beautiful Persian, and not to allow Noureddin to enter should he come.
She had no sooner gone than he arrived, and not finding his mother in her apartment, would have sought her in that of the Persian.
Much astonished to see the vizir's wife enter in tears, the Persian asked what misfortune had happened.
But, madam," inquired the Persian, "what harm is there in that?
Khacan, entering shortly after this, was much astonished to find his wife and her slaves in tears, and the beautiful Persian greatly perturbed.
I will come to his aid, and while pointing out that you only yield his life at my supplications, you can force him to take the beautiful Persian on any conditions you please.
I pardon you on her intercession, and on the conditions that you take the beautiful Persian for your wife, and not your slave, that you never sell her, nor put her away.
The vizir, feeling that his end was at hand, sent for Noureddin, and charged him with his dying breath never to part with the beautiful Persian.
Sometimes the fair Persian consented to appear at these festivities, but she disapproved of this lavish expenditure, and did not scruple to warn Noureddin of the probable consequences.