Permian period


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Permian period

the last period of the Palaeozoic era which lasted from 280 to 240 million years ago. Amphibians declined in numbers, reptiles increased, and conifers became commoner during this period. Many extinctions occurred, including that of the trilobites. Mammal-like reptiles appeared and the first beetles, caddis and bugs evolved. The site of London was at 10 °N.
References in periodicals archive ?
The carbonate reservoir from the Late Permian period was not encountered.
The Permian period ended with the third and largest mass extinction that wiped out 90% of aquatic species and 70% of land animals.
Abundance of this typical marine ichnocoenoses in laterally distant areas within several narrow time frames demarcate short phases of anoxia in eastern India during end early Permian period. In this paper, we correlate such anoxic fluctuations with periods of falling-oxygenation within the global oxygen-carbon dioxide fluctuation in the late Paleozoic atmosphere.
The animal, roughly one foot in size and reptilian in appearance, roamed the dunes located in northern Arizona during the Permian Period, the last period before the rise of dinosaurs, Cranwell said.
Bristol University has discovered the worst mass extinction at the end of the Permian period 251million years ago, was caused by a six degree rise.
EARTH TEEMED WITH LIFE AT THE CLOSE of the Permian period 251 million years ago.
Edibamus apparently became extinct toward the end of the Permian period 250 million years ago, according to the researchers.
Flash back 250 million years, to the Permian period, long before the first dinosaur ever laid tracks: All land on Earth is massed together into one huge, perhaps tropical supercontinent called Pangaea.
Because bryozoans lived in all the seas of that remote world, their fossils have long been considered an important part of the quest to reveal more about conditions during the Late Permian Period.
This group has an (https://www.nature.com/articles/srep19215) excellent fossil record  extending back to the Permian period of the Palaeozoic era (250m years ago).
It chronicles the mass extinction at the end of the Permian period and highlights the work of key scientists in paleontology and geology.