peripatetic

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Related to Peripatetics: Peripateticism, Aristotelian

per·i·pa·tet·ic

(per'i-pă-tet'ik),
1. Walking around; formerly used to describe a patient with "walking" (i.e., mild) typhoid fever.
2. Relating to a disease imported to a nonendemic area by a host clinically unaffected during the transport phase.
[G. peripatēsis, a walking about]

peripatetic

As used in UK healthcare groups, a term referring to resources or services which are flexible and can be deployed where and when needed, rather than from one fixed place.

per·i·pa·tet·ic

(per'i-pă-tet'ik)
1. Walking around.
2. Relating to a disease imported to a nonendemic area by a host clinically unaffected during the transport phase.
[G. peripatēsis, a walking about]
References in periodicals archive ?
(60.) In this respect, it would seem that Mahdi's assertion in "Alfarabi Against Philoponus," Journal of Near Eastern Studies 26.4 (1967), 236, to the effect that the Christian Peripatetics of Baghdad belong to the "pro-Philoponus camp," is invalid, or at least inaccurate and in need of revision, since, as we have seen, some of these thinkers (e.g., Ibn Suwar, Ibn Zur'a) depart from Philoponus and prefer to follow Plotinus arabus and Proclus arabus on many crucial points.
In contradistinction to the Peripatetics, a corporeal body that undergoes quantitative change always maintains its identity as a single and unbroken unity.
(91) The question of whether Cicero read Aristotle's works himself, or was merely familiar with the thought of his followers in the Peripatetic school, is not of crucial importance to this particular argument (assuming a sufficient amount of continuity between the two sources).
The poets were misusing the mysteries of religion, the Peripatetics -- read "the Paduan Academics," be they the followers of Alexander of Aphrodisias or of Averroes -- were ruining religion by denying the possibility of individual survival, and even by betraying Aristotle whose religious meaning had just been revealed to the learned world through the Latin translation of Themistius's paraphrases made by Ermolao Barbaro in 1481.
He sometimes shows himself to be unsure of the Peripatetic position, (70) or leaves out important information.
Alexander's efforts to understand Aristotle's comments on self-awareness in perception were followed a century later by another Peripatetic commentator, Themistius (317-88 C.E.).
Still other scholars (for example, Rackham) think the term refers to arguments or doctrine that were not peculiar to the Peripatetic school but would be known to the generally informed reader.
In fact Galileo possessed an extraordinary grasp of Aristotle's philosophy, so much so that he was able to engage the peripatetics of his day on the finer points of their interpretations.
The volume begins with a contribution on doxography by Jaap Mansfeld who wrote on Plato, Pythagoras, Aristotle, the Peripatetics, the Stoics, and Thales and his followers "On Causes" as related by Psuedo-Plutarchus and Stobaeus (pp.
In this paper, the author offers some explanations by tracing the development of certain elements of Aristotle's logic via the early Peripatetics to the logic of later antiquity.
1362) found Maimonides's views on divine knowledge to be identical with those of the "ancient philosophers," that is to say, the Peripatetics, as presented by Averroes.
(79) Eduard Zeller, Aristotle and the Earlier Peripatetics, trans.