peripatetic


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to peripatetic: Aristotelian

per·i·pa·tet·ic

(per'i-pă-tet'ik),
1. Walking around; formerly used to describe a patient with "walking" (i.e., mild) typhoid fever.
2. Relating to a disease imported to a nonendemic area by a host clinically unaffected during the transport phase.
[G. peripatēsis, a walking about]

peripatetic

As used in UK healthcare groups, a term referring to resources or services which are flexible and can be deployed where and when needed, rather than from one fixed place.

per·i·pa·tet·ic

(per'i-pă-tet'ik)
1. Walking around.
2. Relating to a disease imported to a nonendemic area by a host clinically unaffected during the transport phase.
[G. peripatēsis, a walking about]
References in periodicals archive ?
The work clearly builds upon the previous studies of Julia Annas, Gisela Striker, and Bob Sharpies, and yet presents a sustained reflection on one strand of Peripatetic philosophy, namely ethical theses, across several centuries, which is largely unprecedented in Anglophone scholarship.
"The peripatetic music service element had to find savings of pounds 40,000 and this was achieved, in the main, through the resignation of a harp teacher and the decision not to replace the post.
Thelwall and Coleridge carried on a mutually admiring correspondence for some time, and Thelwall's experiences and writings clearly influenced the famed romantic poets, especially Wordsworth, whose Excursion shows remarkable similarities to the thematic structure of The Peripatetic. Thelwall's attendance at a dinner party held by Wordsworth soon after he took up residence at Alfoxden in 1797 may very well have caused Wordsworth and Dorothy to lose their inexpensive lease on the lovely mansion that had housed their reunion.
In his letter to Ibn Sina, al-Biruni had objected to the position taken by the Peripatetics on some of the most fundamental aspects of natural philosophy, for he held an independent position on these matters--a position that ultimately challenged many views of Aristotelian physics.
Born in 1903 in New York to a wealthy, influential family, the peripatetic Frissell developed a great interest in and a genuine love for the landscape and people of Newfoundland.
On a recent Friday the peripatetic retailer dropped by a SuperQuinn supermarket in a Dublin suburb.
Most of the sources discussed are already known in the Leonardo scholarship, and one might have wished for more precise historical contextualization of the artist's contacts and peripatetic lifestyle.
Librarians at Penn State identified student athletes as an underserved population and developed a pilot program designed to address the bibliographic needs of this peripatetic group.
Their peripatetic existence "has added a sense of adventure and community spirit," said Dean Peter Elliott, who is leading the $8.6 million project.
Hartley was in the thick of it, part of a peripatetic pack who shuttled from combat zone to combat zone--Ethiopia, Somalia, Sudan, Rwanda--filing dispatches to deadline and partying hard in his down time.
In a country where the entire orthodox health establishment condemns saturated fat and cholesterol from animal sources, and where vending machines have become a fixture in our schools, who wants to hear about a peripatetic dentist who warned about the dangers of sugar and white flour, who thought kids should take cod liver oil, and who believed that butter was the number one health food?