perfectionism

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perfectionism

 [per-fek´shun-izm]
the setting for oneself or others of a standard of flawless work or performance, or at least of one that is higher than the situation requires.

per·fec·tion·ism

(per-fek'shŭn-izm),
A tendency to set rigid high standards of performance for oneself.

perfectionism

(pər-fĕk′shə-nĭz′əm)
n.
A propensity for being displeased with anything that is not perfect or does not meet extremely high standards.

per·fec′tion·ist adj. & n.
per·fec′tion·is′tic adj.

perfectionism

Psychiatry A personality trait of many physicians, consisting of obsessiveness, overwork, checking compulsions, and other behaviors regarding Pt management, and ↓ ability to enjoy family, friends, and basic human needs. See Anal. Cf Obsessive-compulsive disorder.

per·fec·tion·ism

(pĕr-fek'shŭn-izm)
A tendency to set rigid high standards of performance for oneself.
References in periodicals archive ?
Below are some tips for refocusing your perfectionist tendencies toward better avenues:
"Perfectionists tend to neglect asking for help from others and miss out on the benefits a different perspective can offer."
What's more, perfectionists tend to compare themselves to others and feel like they fall short.
Ledley said when she first meets a perfectionist child, she typically sees a kid who looks perfect, has impeccable manners, and is mature beyond their years.
Practise replacing perfectionist or critical thoughts with realistic statements.
To investigate the potential of normal or adaptive perfectionism, Slaney and Ashby (1996) interviewed a criterion group of 37 perfectionists. They chose subjects who either considered themselves to be perfectionists or were considered to be so by others who knew them well.
Knowing where perfectionism comes from (as well as what specific socialization experiences might contribute to perfectionistic tendencies) will make it easier to design intervention strategies that encourage adaptive perfectionism in individuals and discourage (or at least help perfectionists manage) the more maladaptive aspects of perfectionism.
Don't put a perfectionist in a role that is overly complex or requires managing people.
Three qualitatively different groups of perfectionists (i.e., "maladaptive," "adaptive," and "non-perfectionist") have consistently emerged in this line of research, each of which has shown qualitatively distinct normative profiles.
ordinary life the perfectionists are venerable and dreaded entities at the margins of
This is similar to the view of maladaptive perfectionists in that they rarely perceive that they have attained the goal, regardless of the caliber of their performance.
Therefore, to address adequately the simple question of whether there are more perfectionists in the gifted population of a specific age range, more rigorous research studies need to be conducted with reliable and valid perfectionism measures that tap both the positive and negative aspects of perfectionism.