perfectionism

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perfectionism

 [per-fek´shun-izm]
the setting for oneself or others of a standard of flawless work or performance, or at least of one that is higher than the situation requires.

per·fec·tion·ism

(per-fek'shŭn-izm),
A tendency to set rigid high standards of performance for oneself.

perfectionism

(pər-fĕk′shə-nĭz′əm)
n.
A propensity for being displeased with anything that is not perfect or does not meet extremely high standards.

per·fec′tion·ist adj. & n.
per·fec′tion·is′tic adj.

perfectionism

[pərfek′shəniz′əm]
Etymology: L, perficere, to complete
a subjective state in which a person pursues an extremely high standard of performance and, in many cases, demands the same standards of others. Failure to attain the goals may lead to feelings of defeat and other adverse psychological consequences.

perfectionism

Psychiatry A personality trait of many physicians, consisting of obsessiveness, overwork, checking compulsions, and other behaviors regarding Pt management, and ↓ ability to enjoy family, friends, and basic human needs. See Anal. Cf Obsessive-compulsive disorder.

per·fec·tion·ism

(pĕr-fek'shŭn-izm)
A tendency to set rigid high standards of performance for oneself.
References in periodicals archive ?
Practise replacing perfectionist or critical thoughts with realistic statements.
After spending considerable time establishing rapport with a perfectionist youth, Dr.
Because perfectionists base their self-worth on outside measures, they're especially susceptible to comparisons.
In addition, we hypothesized that the tripartite model would provide the most meaningful description of perfectionism for both the Canadian and Chinese groups and would correspond to profiles identified in previous research of adaptive perfectionists, maladaptive perfectionists, and nonperfectionists (Rice et ah, 2013; Richardson et ah, 2014).
Rice & Ashby, 2007), adaptive perfectionists, maladaptive perfectionists, and nonperfectionists would have significantly different levels of depression (with adaptive perfectionists having lower levels and maladaptive perfectionists having higher levels) and significantly different levels of avoidant and active coping.
They chose subjects who either considered themselves to be perfectionists or were considered to be so by others who knew them well.
Responses from Perfectionists and Nonperfectionists about Success and Failure Self-descriptions Perfectionists Nonperfectionists What messages "You can always do "Achieving is from family about better next time; you important, but only if success/failure?
Coupled with their high personal standards, maladaptive perfectionists perceive themselves as failing to perform at a level they believe they are capable of.
Of course, this is the way the world progresses, with the perfectionists as the flag bearers
Specifically, according to their theorizing, the level of personal standards could be used to distinguish perfectionists from nonperfectionists, the high standards and organization could be used to define healthy or adaptive perfectionists, and the high standards and discrepancy could be used to define unhealthy or maladaptive perfectionists.