percussion

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percussion

 [per-kush´un]
1. in physical examination, striking a part of the body with short, sharp blows of the fingers in order to determine the size, position, and density of the underlying parts by the sound obtained. Percussion is most commonly used on the chest and back for examination of the heart and lungs. For example, since the heart is not resonant and the adjacent lungs are, when the examiner's fingers strike the chest over the heart the sound waves will change in pitch. This serves as a guide to the precise location and size of the heart.
2. the rhythmic clapping of cupped hands over various segments of the lungs to mobilize secretions; called also cupping.
Percussion. (def. 1) From Jarvis, 1996.
auscultatory percussion auscultation of the sound produced by percussion.
immediate percussion that in which the blow is struck directly against the body surface.
mediate percussion that in which a pleximeter is used.
palpatory percussion a combination of palpation and percussion, affording tactile rather than auditory impressions.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

per·cus·sion

(per-kŭsh'ŭn),
1. A diagnostic procedure designed to determine the density of a body part by the sound produced by tapping the surface with the finger or a plessor; performed primarily over the chest to determine presence of normal air content in the lungs and over the abdomen to evaluate air in the loops of intestine and the size of solid organs such as the liver and spleen.
2. A form of massage, consisting of repeated blows or taps of varying force.
[L. percussio, fr. per-cutio, pp. -cussus, to beat, fr. quatio, to shake, beat]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

percussion

(pər-kŭsh′ən)
n.
1. The striking together of two bodies, especially when noise is produced.
2. The sound, vibration, or shock caused by the striking together of two bodies.
3. The act of detonating a percussion cap in a firearm.
4. A method of medical diagnosis in which various areas of the body, especially the chest, back, and abdomen, are tapped to determine by resonance the condition of internal organs.
5. Music
a. The section of a band or orchestra composed of percussion instruments.
b. Percussion instruments or their players considered as a group.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

percussion

Alternative medicine
A massage technique that consists of chopping and drumming by the sides of the hand to “fleshy” tissues (e.g., the back, buttocks and thighs).
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

per·cus·sion

(pĕr-kŭsh'ŭn)
1. A diagnostic procedure designed to determine the density of a part by the sound produced by tapping the surface with the finger or a plessor; performed primarily over the chest to determine presence of normal air content in the lungs and over the abdomen to evaluate air in the loops of intestine.
2. A form of massage, consisting of repeated blows or taps of varying force.
[L. percussio, fr. per-cutio, pp. -cussus, to beat, fr. quatio, to shake, beat]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

percussion

A technique used in examining the chest or the abdomen. A finger of one hand is pressed firmly on the part and tapped briskly with a finger of the other hand. The quality or resonance of the sound produced indicates whether the underlying area is air-filled, fluid-filled or solid.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Percussion

An assessment method in which the surface of the body is struck with the fingertips to obtain sounds that can be heard or vibrations that can be felt. It can determine the position, size, and consistency of an internal organ. It is done over the chest to determine the presence of normal air content in the lungs, and over the abdomen to evaluate air in the loops of the intestine.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

per·cus·sion

(pĕr-kŭsh'ŭn)
Diagnostic procedure designed to determine density of a body part by sound produced by tapping surface with finger or plessor.
[L. percussio, fr. per-cutio, pp. -cussus, to beat, fr. quatio, to shake, beat]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
We also have excellent links with professional percussionists working in Cardiff who provide tuition and mentoring support to our students and offer access to rehearsals with our locally-based professional orchestras, including WNO and BBC NOW.
Type of participants: String, woodwind and brass instrumentalists, percussionists, pianists and vocalists.
The piece depicts a virtuoso trumpeter in battle with a single percussionist performing in a multiple-percussion setup of 39 instruments.
Trained as a percussionist at the Berklee School of Music and tile Hartt College of Music, Smith (b.
In 1956, the Afro-Cuban percussionist Mongo Santamaria organized the first public performance of Orisha music and dance at the Palladium night club, in tribute to the Yoruba Orisha Chango.
Type of participants: Keyboard and wind instrumentalists and percussionists. Age or grade level: Secondary and collegiate through adult.
One percussionist plays on four timpani and ratchet.
Most instrumentalists, especially percussionists, learn to play kinesthetically, also known as "muscle memory." The kinesthetic goal in developing the stroke is to have both hands feel the same when playing.
Tap dancers fall into several categories: jazz-tap purists play their feet and consider themselves percussionists first; the Fred Astaire/Nicholas Brothers ilk focus on whole body moves but are still considered tappers.
The band comes from an eclectic background, with Living Colour percussionists Wil Calhoun and former John Coltrane bassist Reggie Workman joining long-time Steve Reich percussionist Glen Velez and Iranian classical musician Reza Derkhsani.
And this season, she had to forgo county support in order to present Grupo Desandann, a spirited ensemble of vocalists and percussionists descended from Haitian immigrants to Cuba.