passerine

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passerine

(păs′ə-rīn′)
adj.
Of or relating to birds of the order Passeriformes, which have feet specialized for grasping branches and similar structures, with the first toe facing backward. The order includes the songbirds and certain other groups, such as the flycatchers of the Americas.
n.
A bird of the order Passeriformes. Also called perching bird.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

passerine

any member of the avian order Passeriformes (singing or perching birds), which includes some half of the known species of birds.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Moreover, all the known Archaeopteryx fossils, including the newly described one, have highly curved claws, a trait typical of modern perching birds but uncharacteristic of their ground-dwelling kin.
Furthermore, rather than pointing forward as in a theropod or backward as in a perching bird, the Archaeopteryx first toe pointed sideways as a human thumb does, says Mayr.
We do not yet know why pair bonds mean so little to kingbirds, but lack of fidelity appears to be pervasive among migratory perching birds. Like many things about kingbirds, they simply take this to an extreme.
Perching birds have claw curvature that lies between that of walkers and climbers, Krauss notes.
Hagston encourages Jackson County residents to call the health department to report sick or deceased crows, blue jays, robins or other perching birds. Officials will determine if the bird should be submitted to a lab for West Nile virus testing.
Among perching birds, or passerines, in these zones, 90 percent defend territories during the breeding season but not the rest of the year.
Among the big columns of the cactus Echinopsis chilensis, the plants with the longest spines had the fewest and shortest visits from perching birds. From the cactus' point of view, that must seem a trend worth encouraging, Medel notes, because mistletoe-ridden plants produced less than half the seeds of uninfected plants.
He found that the degree of claw curvature is a clear indicator of lifestyle: Ground-dwelling species have straighter claws, perching birds have moderately curved claws, and birds that climb tree trunks have very curved claws.