Peptostreptococcus

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Peptostreptococcus

 [pep″to-strep″to-kok´us]
a genus of gram-positive, aerobic, coccoid bacteria; they are part of the normal flora of the mouth, upper respiratory tract, and large intestine and are also opportunistic pathogens that cause soft tissue infections and bacteremias. Species include P. anaero´bius, P. lanceola´tus, P. mi´cros, and P. produc´tus.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

Peptostreptococcus

(pep'tō-strep'tō-kok'ŭs),
A genus of nonmotile, anaerobic, chemoorganotrophic bacteria (family Peptococcaceae) containing spheric to ovoid, gram-positive cells that occur in pairs and short or long chains. These organisms are found in normal and pathologic female genital tracts and blood in puerperal fever, in respiratory and intestinal tracts of normal humans and other animals, in the oral cavity, and in pyogenic infections, putrefactive war wounds, and appendicitis; they may be pathogenic. The type species is Peptostreptococcus anaerobius.
[G. peptō, to digest, + streptos, curved, + kokkos, berry]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

Pep·to·strep·to·coc·cus

(pep'tō-strep-tō-kok'ŭs)
A genus of nonmotile, anaerobic, chemoorganotrophic bacteria containing spheric to ovoid, gram-positive cells that occur in pairs and short or long chains. These organisms are found in normal and pathologic female genital tracts and blood in puerperal fever, in respiratory and intestinal tracts of normal humans and other animals, in the oral cavity, and in pyogenic infections, putrefactive war wounds, and appendicitis; they may be pathogenic. The type species is P. anaerobius.
[G. peptō, to digest, + streptos, curved, + kokkos, berry]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Pep·to·strep·to·coc·cus

(pep'tō-strep-tō-kok'ŭs)
A genus of nonmotile, anaerobic, chemoorganotrophic bacteria found in normal and pathologic female genital tracts and blood in puerperal fever, in respiratory and intestinal tracts of normal humans and other animals, in the oral cavity, and in pyogenic infections, and appendicitis; may be pathogenic.
[G. peptō, to digest, + streptos, curved, + kokkos, berry]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Coli, and various Streptococcus species (peptostreptococci, nonhemolytic streptococci, microaerophilic streptococci, and [beta]-hemolytic streptococci of groups A, B, and C) [2, 3].
Only 4 ears showed pure anaerobic culture (3.36%), out of which 3 were peptostreptococci and one was Peptococcus.
Smoker T1 Yeast Candida 1% Aggregatibacter ssp 14% Porphyromonas gingivalis 16% Aggregatibacter 20% Peptococci 7% Peptostreptococci ssp 6% Aggregatibacter aphrophilus 2% Fusibacterium ssp 3% Streptococcus pyogenes 13% Porphyromonas Spp 13% Arcannobacterium pyogenes 4% Porphyromonas endodontalis 11% Note: Table made from pie chart.
Other organism involved in wound infection are streptococci, entrobacteriaceae, peptostreptococci and rarely candida or mycobactrium especially in immuno-compromised patients.
Considered the variety of species composition presence of pathogenic Escherichia (enterotoxigenic and enteropathogenic strains--E.coli [Hly.sup.+], 055:K59; opportunistic pathogenic peptostreptococci, bacteria of Proteus, Citrobacter, Enterobacter, Hafnia, Serratia genus, haemolytical enterococci, staphylococci, yeast-like fungi of Candida genus) had determined, that totally represented 19 taxonomic groups.
have demonstrated that the mucous membranes of healthy people are colonized by Bifidobacteria, Lactobacilli, Bacteroides, Escherichia, and Enterococci, as contrasted with the mucous membranes in RA subjects, which are mainly colonized by aerobic opportunistic conventionally pathogenic enterobacteria (i.e., enteropathogen ic Escherichia, Citro-bacter, Enterobacter, Klebsielia, etc.), Staphylococci, Enterococci, and other anaerobic bacteria (Bacteroides, Peptococci, Peptostreptococci, etc.).
In our study, among 20 strains of peptostreptococci, 35% were resistant to penicillin and 5% to clindamycin, with no resistance to metronidazole.
Anaerobes far outnumber aerobes and conventional culture techniques used to enumerate microbial flora have shown that Bacteroides, eubacteria, clostridia, ruminococci, peptococci, peptostreptococci, bifidobacteria and fusobacteria represent the predominant flora in adults (19,20) while facultative anaerobes such as Escherichia, Klebsiella, Proteus, Lactobacillus and enterococci are some members forming the subdominant genera (10).
TABLE 2 Microbial Origin of Pelvic Inflammatory Disease Exogenous Endogenous Other Sexually transmitted diseases Vaginal bacteriosis Escherichia coli Neisseria gonorrhoeae Gardnerella vaginalis Haemophilus spp Chlamydia trachomatis Bacteroides spp Group B streptococci Mycoplasmas(*) Prevotella spp Staphylococci Peptostreptococci Pneumonococci Mobiluncus Streptococci Mycoplasmas Table adapted from Sweet RL.
Among them the gram positive Peptostreptococci spp were the most common organisms isolated from culture constituting 9 (41%) out of 22 isolates.
In single cases, anaerobic bacteria--Bacteroides spp and peptostreptococci were found.