peptide

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peptide

 [pep´tīd]
any member of a class of compounds of low molecular weight that yield two or more amino acids on hydrolysis. They are the constituent parts of proteins and are formed by loss of water from the NH2 and COOH groups of adjacent amino acids. Peptides are known as dipeptides, tripeptides, tetrapeptides, and so on depending on the number of amino acids in the molecule. See also polypeptide.
vasoactive intestinal peptide vasoactive intestinal polypeptide.

pep·tide

(pep'tīd),
A compound of two or more amino acids in which a carboxyl group of one is united with an amino group of another, with the elimination of a molecule of water, thus forming a peptide bond, -CO-NH-; that is, a substituted amide.
See also: polypeptide. Compare: eupeptide bond, isopeptide bond.

peptide

/pep·tide/ (pep´tīd) (pep´tid) any of a class of compounds of low molecular weight that yield two or more amino acids on hydrolysis; known as di-, tri-, tetra-, (etc.) peptides, depending on the number of amino acids in the molecule. Peptides form the constituent parts of proteins.
atrial natriuretic peptide  (ANP) a hormone involved in natriuresis and the regulation of renal and cardiovascular homeostasis.
opioid peptide  opioid (2).

peptide

(pĕp′tīd′)
n.
Any of various natural or synthetic compounds containing two or more amino acids joined by peptide bonds that link the carboxyl group of one amino acid to the amino group of another.

pep·tid′ic (-tĭd′ĭk) adj.
pep·tid′i·cal·ly adv.

peptide

[pep′tīd]
Etymology: Gk, peptein, to digest
a molecular chain compound composed of two or more amino acids joined by peptide bonds. See also amino acid, polypeptide, protein.

peptide

A biomolecule consisting of two or more amino acids joined by a peptide bond, which combine to make proteins.

pep·tide

(pep'tīd)
A compound of two or more amino acids in which a carboxyl group of one is united with an amino group of another, with the elimination of a molecule of water, thus forming a peptide bond, -CO-NH-; i.e., a substituted amide.
Compare: bioregulator

peptide

A chain of two or more AMINO ACIDS linked by peptide bonds between the amino and carboxyl groups of adjacent acids. Large peptides, containing many amino acids, are called polypeptides. Chains of linked polypeptides, are called PROTEINS. Peptides occur widely in the body. Many HORMONES are peptides.

peptide

any of a group of compounds consisting of two or more amino acids linked by chemical bonding. See PEPTIDE BOND, DIPEPTIDE.

pep·tide

(pep'tīd)
Compound of two or more amino acids in which a carboxyl group of one is united with an amino group of another, with the elimination of a molecule of water, thus forming a peptide bond.

peptide,

n a compound of two or more amino acids in which the α-carboxyl group of one is united with the α-amino group of another, with the elimination of a molecule of water, creating a peptide bond —CO—NH—.
Peptostreptococcus
n a genus of nonmotile, anaerobic, chemoor-ganotrophic bacteria found in the oral cavity and intestinal tracts of normal humans. They may be pathogenic and may be found in pyogenic infections, putrefactive war wounds, and appendicitis.

peptide

any of a class of compounds of low molecular weight which yield two or more amino acids on hydrolysis; known as di-, tri-, tetra- etc. peptides, depending on the number of amino acids in the molecule. Peptides form the constituent parts of proteins. See also polypeptide.

leader peptide
a step in the signal hypothesis advanced to explain the mechanisms governing the fate of newly formed polypeptides or secretory proteins.
peptide map
a pattern of peptide fragments, characteristic of a particular protein. Produced by using either proteolytic enzymes such as trypsin or chemicals such as cyanogen bromide to cut proteins at a relatively small number of particular sites, the peptide fragments are then separated by chromatographic or electrophoretic procedures. Called also fingerprint.
peptide-para-aminobenzoic acid test
References in periodicals archive ?
To do this, we first developed an analytic method that could be used to identify theoretically discriminating tryptic peptide fragments.
Goldstein, Emeritus Chairman of the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine at the George Washington University School of Medicine and RegeneRx's chief scientific advisor, said: "This is a very biologically active peptide fragment of TB4 as indicated in a number of animal models that has properties that could be useful in both medical, as well as cosmeceutical, product candidates.
The observed variation between the N-terminal modifications of ANPsp(16-25) and BNPsp(17-26) suggest subtle, but distinct, differences in the mechanism of processing of both signal peptide fragments.
The base peak chromatogram reveals the presence of several different peptide fragments obtained after tryptic digestion of the affinity chromatography-trapped plasma sample (Fig.
Peptide fragments of fibrinogen also accumulate (56).
The resulting peptide fragment spectra were produced in the product-ion scan mode (spray voltage, 950 V; collision energy, 28 eV).
The lowercase letters depict the peptide fragments listed in Table 1, and (-) indicates that this peptide fragment was not detectable.
Resolved proteins are identified by peptide fragment sequencing using capillary column, reversed-phase HPLC-MS.
In a world first, the peptide immunotherapy, an antigen-specific form of the treatment, works by leveraging proinsulin peptide fragments - a precursor form of insulin - to lessen adverse immune response.
The LC-MS / MS analysis is used for qualitative and quantitative analysis of small molecules and peptide fragments and thus represents the backbone for the assessment of our metabolic engineering approaches.
To further identify ZE2 peptide-binding site on E2, 15 peptide fragments (from P1 to P15), which were based on the genotype 1a E2 amino acid sequence and secondary structure, were synthesized (HD Biosciences Co.
AMPs can be divided into five sub-categories on the basis of their amino acid composition and structure including anionic peptides, linear amphipathic [alpha]-helical, cationic peptides enriched for specific amino acids, peptide fragments, and peptides with cysteines that form intramolecular bonding (Table 2).