peppermint

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pep·per·mint

(pep'ĕr-mint),
Dried leaves and flowering tops of Mentha piperita (family Labiatae); a carminative and antiemetic.

peppermint

/pep·per·mint/ (-mint) the perennial herb Mentha piperita, or a preparation of its dried leaves and flowering tops, which have carminative, gastric stimulant, and counterirritant properties; used for gastrointestinal, liver, and gallbladder disturbances; also used in folk medicine and in homeopathy.

peppermint

(pĕp′ər-mĭnt′)
n.
1. A hybrid perennial plant (Mentha ×piperita) in the mint family, having small purple or white flowers and downy leaves that yield a pungent oil used as a flavoring and in some medicinal preparations.
2. A candy or lozenge flavored with oil from this plant.

peppermint

the dried leaves and flowering tops of an herb, Mentha piperita. A source of a volatile oil, it is used as a carminative and antiemetic.
A perennial herb that contains azulene, betaine, carotenoids, choline, flavonoids, menthol, rosmarinic acid, tannins, and volatile oil containing bisabolene, cineole, limonene, menthol, menthone, pulegol, etc; peppermint leaves and stalks are analgesic, antibacterial, antiparasitic, antispasmodic, carminative, diaphoretic, stimulating, a nerve tonic, and sedative
Chinese medicine Peppermint is used in Chinese herbal medicine as an infusion for cough, flatulence, headaches, laryngitis, indigestion, menstrual disorders, sinusitis
Herbal medicine Uses Internally for colic, flatulence, inflammation, and increased bile flow, inhaled as an expectorant, for respiratory tract infections, and topically as a local anaesthetic
Toxicity Pure peppermint should not be ingested, as it causes arrhythmias; peppermint tea should be ingested with caution in young children and pregnancy, and never in women with a history of miscarriage

peppermint,

n See mint.

pep·per·mint

(pep'ĕr-mint)
Dried leaves and flowering tops of Mentha piperita; carminative and antiemetic.
References in periodicals archive ?
A study published in the British Medical Journal came to the conclusion that peppermint oil is a good treatment for people who suffer from irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).
The science is that peppermint acts as an antispasmodic, meaning that it stops the stomach and the bowel cramping - going into spasm - which causes pain and bloating.
As a bonus, peppermint is also a natural painkiller.
We can't wait for guests to come in and enjoy our new delicious line of Peppermint flavors, and essentially, get a taste of the holidays
This winter, not only is it the perfect time to come in to locations nationwide to enjoy the line of Peppermint treats, but it's also the perfect time to pick up a gift card for that special someone.
Peppermint Crackle - White Peppermint Ice Cream with YORK[sup.
To me, peppermint is the very essence of Christmas.
The familiar re and white peppermint canes we enjoy today appeared first in the earl twentieth century.
Although we think of peppermint as primarily a sweet, the oil extracted from the plant is recognized as one of the oldest treatments in herbal medicine.
The four brands include Phillips Peppermint Schnapps, Phillips Gin-Ka, Phillips Sno Shoe Grog and the original Phillips Vodka.
Marking the 75th year of its availability, Peppermint Schnapps is the first Bonafide Original now available with its original label.
Phillips Sno Shoe Grog, the original outdoorsman's favorite blend of brandy and peppermint schnapps, was first introduced in 1963.