aldehyde

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aldehyde

 [al´dĕ-hīd]
an organic compound containing the aldehyde functional group (-CHO); that is, one with a carbonyl group (C=O) located at one end of the carbon chain.

al·de·hyde

(al'dĕ-hīd),
A compound containing the radical -CH=O, reducible to an alcohol (CH2OH) and oxidizable to a carboxylic acid (COOH), for example, acetaldehyde.

aldehyde

/al·de·hyde/ (al´dĕ-hīd)
1. any of a class of organic compounds containing the group —CHO, i.e., one with a carbonyl group (CdbondO) located at one end of the carbon chain.
2. a suffix used to denote a compound occurring in aldehyde conformation.

aldehyde

[al′dəhīd′]
Etymology: Ar, alkohl + L, dehydrogenatum, dehydrogenated
any of a large category of organic compounds derived from the oxidation of a corresponding primary alcohol, as in the conversion of ethyl alcohol to acetaldehyde, also known as ethanal. Each aldehyde is characterized by a carbonyl group (─CO─) attached directly to a hydrogen (─CHO) in its formula and can be converted into a corresponding acid by oxidation, as in the conversion of acetaldehyde to acetic acid.

aldehyde

An organic compound with a formyl group (R-CHO), which is double-bonded to an O2 (i.e., a carbonyl group, C=O), single-bonded to a hydrogen and single-bonded to another group (e.g., methane, benzene, hydrogen, etc.). The aldehydes in some essential oils contribute to their pleasant odoor, including vanillin, cilantro and cinnamaldehyde.

Example
Acetaldehyde (CH3CHO), butyraldehyde (CH3(CH2)2CHO).

al·de·hyde

(al'dĕ-hīd)
A compound containing the radical -CH=O, reducible to an alcohol (-CH2OH), oxidizable to a carboxylic acid (-COOH); e.g., acetaldehyde.

aldehyde

A product of dehydrogenated (metabolized) alcohol, hence the name. Aldehydes cause most of the toxic effects of bibulous overindulgence (hangover).

aldehyde,

n hydrocarbon characterized by strong scent; antiviral, antiinflammatory, and soothing properties. Can irritate skin if administered improperly.
Enlarge picture
Aldehyde.

al·de·hyde

(al'dĕ-hīd)
A compound containing the radical -CH=O, reducible to an alcohol (-CH2OH), oxidizable to a carboxylic acid (-COOH); e.g., acetaldehyde.

aldehyde (al´dəhīd´),

n a large category of organic compounds derived from a corresponding alcohol by the removal of two hydrogen atoms, as in the conversion of ethyl alcohol to acetaldehyde.

aldehyde

an organic compound containing the aldehyde functional group (−CHO); that is, one with a carbonyl group (C=O) located at one end of the carbon chain. Aldehydes are formed in meat during the rancidification of fat and in the degradation of alcohols in biological materials. They have an acrid unpleasant taste and are toxic if taken in sufficient quantities. Some aldehydes (formaldehyde and glutaraldehyde) are used as disinfectants and fixatives.
References in periodicals archive ?
The high amounts of hexanal and pentanal that are formed compared with those with Co-EH and [Mn(acac)[.
Since pentanal showed the most sensitive response with the change of TVOC emissions, it may be used for the prediction of TVOC emissions for practical purposes.
The 3-week-old pellet sample emitted about 28 times more pentanal and 8 times more hexanal than the reference pellets.
From the above results it is assumed that the pungent smell was due to hexanal and pentanal, although other compounds might also be involved.
Of individual compounds in the unextracted sawdust sample (sample 1), [alpha]-pinene, 3-carene, furfurals, limonene, pentanal, and hexanal were the most abundant.
Aldehydes, such as pentanal and hexanal, are important but the amount and composition of emitted substances are affected by drying temperatures of the raw material and self-heating in pellet stocks.
Spruce and stored pine sawdust contains lower amounts of unsaturated fatty acids than fresh pine sawdust and thus should generate lower amounts of aldehydes such as hexanal and pentanal.
The following target compounds were based on a review of the literature (8,11,22,25,28,30) and include the major terpenes, aldehydes, and alcohols that have been associated with wood products: benzaldehyde, benzene, borneol, camphene, 3-carene, p-cymene, heptanal, heptane, 2-heptanone, 3-heptanone, hexanal, limonene, nonanal, octanal, octane, t-2-octenal, pentanal, pentane, 1-pentanol, [alpha]-pinene, [beta]-pinene, toluene, xylenes.
Among target compounds, the predominant VOCs emitted from the particleboard and MDF specimens were straightchain aldehydes, including pentanal, hexanal, and t-2-octenal, and the terpenoid compounds.
The most prevalent aldehydes in both particleboard and MDF were hexanal, pentanal, benzaldehyde, and heptanal.
In short, although pathways exist for some of the aldehydes and ketones that are observed in wood product emissions, there are no mechanisms for other aldehydes (for example, pentanal, heptanal, and octanal).