Penicillium

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Related to Penicilium: Penicillium marneffei

Penicillium

 
a genus of imperfect fungi of the form-class Hyphomycetes; many species are commonly found in the human environment. Some are toxic, and others are sources of penicillins.

Penicillium

(pen'i-sil'ē-ŭm),
A genus of fungi (class Ascomycetes, order Aspergillales), some species of which yield various antibiotic substances and biologicals; for example, P. citrinum yields citrinin; Penicillium claviforme, Penicillium expansum, and Penicillium patulum yield patulin; Penicillium chrysogenum yields penicillin; Penicillium griseofulvum yields griseofulvin; Penicillium notatum yields penicillin and notatin; Penicillium cyclopium and Penicillium puberulum yield penicillic acid; Penicillium purpurogenum and Penicillium rubrum yield rubratoxin. Penicillium marneffei is a true pathogen in Southeast Asia in bamboo rats.
[see penicillus]

penicillium

(pĕn′ĭ-sĭl′ē-əm)
n. pl. peni·cilliums or peni·cillia (-sĭl′ē-ə)
Any of various characteristically bluish-green fungi of the genus Penicillium that grow as molds on decaying fruits and ripening cheese and are used in the production of antibiotics such as penicillin and in making cheese.

Pen·i·cil·li·um

(pen'i-sil'ē-ŭm)
A genus of fungi, some species of which yield various antibiotic substances and biologicals.
See: penicillus

Penicillium

(pĕn″ĭ-sĭl′ē-ŭm) [L. penicillum, brush]
Enlarge picture
PENICILLIUM IN CULTURE
A genus of molds belonging to the Ascomycetes (sac fungi). They form the blue molds that grow on fruits, bread, and cheese. A number of species (P. chrysogenum, P. notatum) are the source of penicillin. Occasionally in humans they produce infections of the external ear, skin, or respiratory passageways. They are common allergens. See: illustration

Penicillium marneffei

A species that may cause systemic infections, esp. in immunocompromised patients. It is found most often in Southeast Asia, where it frequently infects patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.
illustration

Penicillium

One of a range of common blue-green moulds of the genus Penicillium , that grow on decaying fruits and ripening cheese. Penicillium species such as P. notatum and P. rubrum were originally studied by Fleming in investigating the properties of the antibiotic penicillin. (Alexander Fleming, 1881–1955, Scottish bacteriologist).

Pen·i·cil·li·um

(pen'i-sil'ē-ŭm)
Fungal genus; some species yield various antibiotic substances and biologicals.
References in periodicals archive ?
Of the 382 cell lines, 16 had no cross reaction with purified proteins from endophyte isolate EDN11, and only 2 cell lines had no cross reaction with proteins purified from Cladysporium, Penicilium, Fusarium, and Aspergillus spp.
Two strains of the fungi Penicilium (MSF1) and Aspergillus (MSF2) were identified under the microscope on the basis of morphological characteristics (Domsch et al., 1980).
Four pathogenic fungi (Fusarium oxysporium, Rhizopus stolonifer, Penicilium oxalicum and Aspergillus niger) were isolated from the rotted D.
En la obra Mycotoxins and Phycotoxins los autores abordan principalmente las toxinas de los hongos Aspergillus, Penicilium y Fusarium, asi como las toxinas de algas.
Through the microbiological analysis it was established 24 isolates, including two bacterial genera and six fungal genera associated with the agroforestry system, which were Pseudomonas y Coliformes spp., Trichoderma spp., Penicilium sp., Fusarium spp., Phytium spp., Aspergillus spp., y Rizophus sp.
Nowadays in Brazil it can be mentioned studies in nematode controlling in guava tree by weevils (Conotrachelus psidii); pre immunization against citrus sadness by weak origins of the virus (BOECHAD & BETTIOL, 2009); the control of grey mold in multiple cultures by the fungi Clonostachys rosea (ZOU et al., 2010), besides e fungi known as pathogenic which can be opposed to other pathogens which produces metabolites and inhibits enzymes, and/or tissues destruction like the mycotoxins of Penicilium sp and Aspergillus sp (ESPOSITO & AZEVEDO, 2004) and glucanases and eniatinas of Fusarium sp.