Kegel exercise

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Related to Pelvic Floor Muscle Exercise: Pelvic Floor Muscle Training

Kegel exercise

(kā′gəl)
n.
Any of various exercises involving controlled contraction and release of the muscles at the base of the pelvis, used especially as a treatment for urinary incontinence.

Kegel exercise

(ka'gel)
[Arnold H. Kegel, U.S. gynecologist, 1894–1981]
An exercise for strengthening the pubococcygeal and levator ani muscles. The patient should repeatedly and rapidly alternate contracting and relaxing the muscles for 10 seconds; relax for 20 seconds, then sustain the contraction for 10 to 20 seconds; the patient should then rest for 10 seconds and repeat the routine until fatigued. The number of repetitions should be increased gradually to between 50 and 150 per day.
Synonym: pelvic floor exercise See: incontinence, stress urinary
References in periodicals archive ?
Biofeedback, electrical stimulation, pelvic floor muscle exercises, and vaginal cones: a combined rehabilitative approach for sexual dysfunction associated with urinary incontinence.
Pelvic floor muscle exercises were combined with biofeedback and/or electrical stimulation so it was not possible to draw any conclusions about the effect of exercises alone.
FES Biofeedback versus intensive pelvic floor muscle exercise for the prevention and treatment of genuine stress incontinence.
In 1948, Kegel recommended the use of pelvic floor muscle exercises along with a pneumatic device called a perineometer to measure by way of biofeedback the strength of pelvic floor muscle contractions (Khan & Rizvi, 2005).
Other authors have suggested that teaching pelvic floor muscle exercises pre-operatively will help the patient to understand the aims of the exercises and learn how to activate the muscles before there is any surgical damage or pain (Burgio et al.
Pelvic Floor Muscle Exercise Followup Performing Not Performing Total # of Patients 21 11 Symptoms Same or 19 (90%) 3 (27%) Better Symptoms Worse 2 (10%) 8 (73%)
Pelvic floor muscle exercises may be effective in treating post-micturition dribble in men with or without erectile dysfunction (Grade B).
Patients were instructed in using anal palpation and in pelvic floor muscle exercises that they were to practice in three daily sessions at home.
The research team from Rush University Medical Centre have found that a program of pelvic floor muscle exercises, combined with pelvic health education, can be an effective way to manage urinary incontinence.
The patient was taught pelvic floor muscle exercises in the fifth week and was encouraged to practice them at home.
In a preliminary study that included 33 women with long-term vulvar symptoms, 16 weeks of at-home pelvic floor muscle exercises monitored with a portable electromyographic biofeedback instrument led to an increase in pelvic floor contractions in 95%, decreased resting tension in 68%, and diminished instability of the pelvic floor at rest in 62%.
The program includes electromyographic biofeedback, pelvic floor muscle exercises and bladder and bowel retraining.