Kegel exercise

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Related to Pelvic Floor Muscle Exercise: Pelvic Floor Muscle Training

Kegel exercise

(kā′gəl)
n.
Any of various exercises involving controlled contraction and release of the muscles at the base of the pelvis, used especially as a treatment for urinary incontinence.

Kegel exercise

(ka'gel)
[Arnold H. Kegel, U.S. gynecologist, 1894–1981]
An exercise for strengthening the pubococcygeal and levator ani muscles. The patient should repeatedly and rapidly alternate contracting and relaxing the muscles for 10 seconds; relax for 20 seconds, then sustain the contraction for 10 to 20 seconds; the patient should then rest for 10 seconds and repeat the routine until fatigued. The number of repetitions should be increased gradually to between 50 and 150 per day.
Synonym: pelvic floor exercise See: incontinence, stress urinary
References in periodicals archive ?
Pelvic floor muscle exercises were combined with biofeedback and/or electrical stimulation so it was not possible to draw any conclusions about the effect of exercises alone.
FES Biofeedback versus intensive pelvic floor muscle exercise for the prevention and treatment of genuine stress incontinence.
Pelvic floor muscle exercises, traditional or resisted, have been shown to reduce the symptoms of SUI bringing life and control back to these individuals.
The effect of pelvic floor muscle exercises on genuine stress incontinence among Korean women focusing on its effects on the quality of life.
One RCT (n=24) randomised the subjects to either a biofeedback with pelvic floor muscle exercises group (45 minute sessions at 6, 7, 9, 11, and 16 weeks post-op) or a "no instruction" control group.
In a RCT, 63 males four or more weeks after radical retropubic prostatectomy (mean age [greater than] 65 years) were randomised to either pelvic floor muscle exercises with intensive physiotherapy, PFME with electrical stimulation (ES), or PFME only provided by simple written and verbal instruction.
1 Pelvic floor muscle exercises plus intensive physiotherapy
The majority of male only trials were examining the effectiveness of pelvic floor muscle exercises with and without other co-interventions in older men suffering urinary incontinence after prostatectomy.
Many of the participants in our trial reported that they had tried pelvic floor muscle exercises after their surgery, but had stopped when they failed to improve sufficiently.
These options include lifestyle changes such as behavioral therapy, fluid management, bladder training or pelvic floor muscle exercises, though some patients may require medications, called anti-muscarinics, or other treatment options.
For the Pelvic Power Program, the Vibration Reminder Disk has been programmed specifically to vibrate several times throughout the day with 15-20 pulses that prompt women to perform pelvic floor muscle exercises and to hold them for specified lengths of time.