Pekingese


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Pekingese

a very small, thickset dog with a large head, very short nose, prominent eyes and pendulous ears. The coat is long, straight and profuse over the body, particularly around the neck where it forms a 'mane', and on the tail, which is carried over the back. The breed is predisposed to distichiasis, hemivertebrae, intervertebral disk disease, proptosis, central corneal ulceration, facial fold pyoderma and anomalies of the upper respiratory tract.
References in periodicals archive ?
4) Evelyn eventually returned to Pekingese in fiction.
WHAT A WHOPPER: Fluffy, the 24ft python, is the longest snake in captivity GOT IT LICKED: Puggy the Pekingese whose 4.
Changes have been made to the breeding standards of a number of breeds this year, including the bulldog - now required to have less wrinkles and longer legs - and the pekingese, which should have a longer nose.
In her memoirs Taylor famously recounts how her Pekingese was, literally, making a meal of the pearl before she salvaged the undamaged jewel from its mouth.
Pekingese, British bulldogs, King Charles spaniels and pugs are very different in looks from their ancestors.
Because he will regret breaking your heart when he hears the rumor you started about how your Aunt Gertie's Pekingese gives better kisses than he does.
Nobody exemplified that spirit better than Jensen, who lost all her physical possessions except for her Pekingese dog.
The silky-haired Maltese was the top dog in ancient Greece and Rome, while the Chinese (quite understandably) had a preference for the Pekingese, their yappie little skeletons having been discovered in 2,000-year-old tombs.
The show's star and co-producer Cesar Millan has tamed terriers, soothed shih-tzus and pacified Pekingese for the police, as well as average citizens and numerous Hollywood celebrities and executives including Will Smith, Michael Eisner, Hilary Duff and Oprah Winfrey.
There is also more here about publishing contracts, payments, taxes, old school rugby and cricket scores, little Pekingese dogs, and who are what when--though to be fair, these are details that compose a real life rather than a novel--than any but a devoted Wodehouse fan would want to learn.