peel

(redirected from Peelite)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

peel

 [pēl]
1. the outer covering of something.
2. to remove such an outer covering.
chemical peel chemabrasion.

peel

(pēl),
To remove the outer layer of something by a stripping or flaying action.
References in periodicals archive ?
81) He had become a convinced Peelite during the repeal of the Corn Laws and he remained one until his death in 1914.
If, as Fink notes, in Contarini Disraeli creates a hero "who is strangely attracted to Venice" (183), so in Coningsby and Sybil, Disraeli seizes upon the traditional symbols of Venetian decline, the failure of "mixed government," and the emasculation of the doge to represent the imbalance in the English constitution caused by the historical ascendancy of the Whig Oligarchy or by the ascendancy within the Tory party of the Castlereagh or Peelite factions.
Palmerston's government was made up of several groups: Whigs, including many of the old landed families, individualists, non-conformists, and some merchants, as well as Peelites who had been rejected by the Tories for supporting free trade and reform; and even some Radicals who were for the most part vigorously reform-minded, non-conformist, and anti-establishment.
Liberal Tory or Peelite economists", he notes, "had regarded debt as sinful, and their dear money policies had been designed to make things difficult for those who sinned", but new economic opportunities and the new economic problems of regular fluctuations in the trade cycle demanded a new moral outlook.
For the Peelite Sir James Graham, discussion of foreign affairs in the Commons now became 'a stand up fight between Cobden and Palmerston--the former the champion of Russia and Christianity, the latter the sworn ally of Turkey and Mahometanism'.
The author argues that Gladstone, who had stayed loyal to Sir Robert Peel and Free Trade when the Conservatives split over the Corn Laws, remained a Peelite all his life.
The Peelite free traders included Aberdeen and Gladstone, the protectionists Lord Stanley and Disraeli.