pediatrician

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pediatrician

 [pe″de-ah-trish´un]
a physician specializing in pediatrics.

pe·di·a·tric·ian

(pē'dē-ă-trish'ăn),
A specialist in pediatrics.
Synonym(s): pediatrist

pediatrician

(pē′dē-ə-trĭsh′ən) also

pediatrist

(-ăt′rĭst)
n.
A physician who specializes in pediatrics.

pe·di·a·tric·ian

(pē'dē-ă-trish'ăn)
A specialist in pediatrics.
Synonym(s): paediatrician.

pe·di·a·tric·ian

(pē'dē-ă-trish'ăn)
A specialist in pediatrics.
Synonym(s): paediatrician.
References in periodicals archive ?
Pediatricians are a special type of doctors who provide preventive health maintenance for healthy children and treatment for children who have either short-term or long-term sickness.
Therefore, expecting parents should find a pediatrician for their child as soon as possible to ensure that well-child visits can begin immediately after the child is born.
The researchers saw a fivefold increase in the likelihood of pediatricians prescribing retinoids (P = .003), after controlling for confounding factors such as sex and insurance status, and significantly less topical clindamycin being prescribed.
Speaking in Mombasa during a pediatricians conference, Ngwiri said children in rural areas have been marginalised.
Table 2 presents data regarding pediatricians' collaboration with MH specialists.
where U5D refers to the number of under-5 deaths in STMCU s at year t; PED refers to pediatrician density in STMCUs at year t, Xis a vector of time-varying characteristics at STMCU level, which includes the following four variables: (1) number of physicians other than pediatricians per total population except for under-5-year-old population, and (2) income per total population by year and STMCU; [[alpha].sub.t] are year fixed effects, which are year-specific effects common to all STMCUs (captured by year dummies); [[gamma].sub.s] are STMCU fixed effects, which absorb all STMCU-specific time-invariant effects; and [epsilon] is a STMCU and year-specific random error term.
In states where philosophical exemptions are not allowed, pediatricians reported no refusals in a typical month more often than in states where exemptions are allowed (17% versus 8%, P = .03); family physicians did not report this difference.
Sixty-one percent of US pediatricians said they did not see a marked change in the number of patients receiving the recommended vaccination schedule.
Forty-four psychiatrists at a large public hospital - the Los Angeles County + University of Southern California Medical Center (LAC+USC) - scored worse than did 48 pediatricians there on the Maslach Burnout Inventory questionnaire.
Keywords: Pediatricians' Ideas; Parental Practices; Child Development; Child Education.
To assess service availability and pediatricians' methods of evaluating and treating high-risk patients, investigators analyzed data from a national survey conducted by the AAP in May-September 2005.
Sixty-five percent of these were physicians; almost all were pediatricians. The overwhelming positive response of these pediatricians to the value of the course (4.4 on a scale of 5), the utility of hypnosis, its ease of use, and its practicality for primary care were conveyed richly in survey comments.