hierarchy

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hi·er·ar·chy

(hī'ĕr-ar-kē, hī-rar'kē),
1. Any system of people or things ranked one above the other.
2. In psychology and psychiatry, an organization of habits or concepts in which simpler components are combined to form increasingly complex integrations.
[G. hierarchia, rule or power of the high priest]

hierarchy

(hī′ə-rär′kē, hī′rär′-)
n. pl. hierar·chies
1. A group of persons or things organized into successive ranks or grades with each level subordinate to the one above: a career spent moving up through the military hierarchy.
2. Categorization or arrangement of a group of people or things into such ranks or grades: classification by hierarchy; discounting the effects of hierarchy.
3. A group of animals in which certain members or subgroups dominate or submit to others.

hi·er·ar·chy

(hī'ĕr-ahr-kē)
1. Any system of people or things ranked one above the other.
2. psychology/psychiatry An organization of habits or concepts in which simpler components are combined to form increasingly complex integrations.
[G. hierarchia, rule or power of the high priest]

hierarchy

(in CLASSIFICATION) the system of ranking in a graded order from species to kingdom. see HIGHER CATEGORY.

hi·er·ar·chy

(hī'ĕr-ahr-kē)
Any system of people or things ranked one above the other.
[G. hierarchia, rule or power of the high priest]

hierarchy (hī´ərär´kē),

n 1. system of persons or things ranked one above the other.
n 2. in psychology and psychiatry, an organization of habits or concepts in which simpler components are combined to form increasingly complex integrations.

hierarchy

order of superiority; the arrangement of echelons of command.

court hierarchy
the way in which the courts in a country are arranged so that appeals can be carried from the lower to the higher courts.