peat

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Patient Environment Action Team

A team which undertakes peer reviews of NHS trusts’ compliance with UK Department of Health standards across a range of parameters, including food, cleanliness, infection control and patient environment (bathrooms, décor, lighting, patient areas). PEATs include people from outside the trust (e.g., from infection control), personnel and patient representatives, and provide a local “snapshot” of the hospital environment on the day of the visit. A PEAT report is produced after each site visit, and may include an action plan if the required standards are not being met.

peat

an accumulation of dead plant material formed in wet conditions in bogs or fens in the absence of oxygen so that decomposition is incomplete. It is usually acidic.

peat,

n in balneotherapy, a mossy plant substance used in baths and peloids. An antiinflammatory, antimicrobial, antineoplastic, antiviral substance, the effects of which include immunological stimulation, increased metabolism, and vessel dilation. See also balneotherapy and peloid.

peat, peat moss

used as bedding for housed cattle and horses and is very absorbent of water.

peat scours
chronic diarrhea in ruminants grazing pasture on peat-derived soils low in copper and/or high in molybdenum. See also copper nutritional deficiency, molybdenum.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Peatland Code now sets out key environmental guidelines to restore a million hectares of peatlands over the next five years, which alone could save 220 million tonnes of CO2 by 2050.
Adding impetus to restoration efforts was last week's launch of a new UK Peatland Code, designed to encourage private sector investment into peatland restoration.
Indonesia's peatland areas are some of the most sensitive ecosystems in the world, while the Kampar Peninsula landscape is one of the largest peatland areas in Southeast Asia.
Most oil contained significantly higher monoterpenes than sesquiterpene, except oil from medium depth peatland where amount of sesquiterpenes slightly higher (38.
cajuputi Powell grows in the peatland contain appreciable amount of y-terpinene, [alpha]-terpinolene, caryophyllene, a-humulene.
The project has a number of additional benefits, including protecting the embedded carbon that peatlands are known to contain.
One of the most important elements to consider when restoring peatland is the people who live and work in these upland areas.
Richard Brunning has put together this book of British archeology with the help of many contributors; the book gives the results of the Monuments at Risk in Somerset Peatlands Project.
Clifton Bain, director of the IUCN UK peatland programme, said: "We are sitting on a compost time bomb with over three billion tonnes of stored carbon in the peat.
Davies's Peatland farmhouse, near Symington, is just 500 metres from the East Ayrshire border.
The smog has drifted north and is now badly affecting Malaysia, while in a badly-hit province on Indonesia's Sumatra island -- where the fires are raging in peatland -- hundreds gathered to pray for rain.