bog

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bog

A quagmire covered with grasses, wet, spongy ground; a small marsh or plant community on moist, acidic peat.

bog

an area of peat formation, typically in upland situations, which supports an extremely OLIGOTROPHIC vegetation. See FEN.
References in periodicals archive ?
A spokesman for Natural Resources Wales - a Welsh Government sponsored body - said: "Peat bogs are a very important part of the nature in Wales and we have several projects working to improve and maintain them across the country.
A police spokesman said the man was "submerged to just below his waist in a peat bog and sinking further by the minute" after stepping into the bog while walking with a friend on Thursday.
"The presence of the cloud-living spider at Lampert Mosses has made the preservation of the peat bogs even more important.
Radiocarbon dating of other Michigan peat bogs suggests organic material 16 feet beneath current ground level might have been in the environment 5,000 years or even longer.
In northern Europe, swamplike areas called peat bogs are great environments for turning bodies into mummies.
Marshland, peat bogs and so on are of paramount importance to store water, filtering it gradually into springs which are responsible for water supplies to many country residents, farms, private houses and so on.
Research from garden charity Garden Organic found more than 24 million wheelbarrows of peat, found in compost, are being used in the UK unnecessarily each year, wiping out peat bogs, killing wildlife and destroying vital habitats.
The traditional uses of peat for fuel and building material was always at a low level and did very little damage to peat bogs.
It was one of the largest private donations of land for conservation in history, and gave the WCS control of some of the world's southernmost old-growth forests, not to mention its most significant peat bogs. Dominated by lenga, a deciduous tree similar to the beech, this wild, windswept land is home to guanaco (a wild relative of the llama), the endangered culpeo fox, the Andean condor, and the Magellanic woodpecker, the largest woodpecker in the Americas.
He said: "Because there are fires within dried out peat bogs the flames themselves keep on simmering underneath the surface of the ground.