peanut allergy

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peanut allergy

Immunology A common cause of anaphylactic reactions which, unlike some allergies, is rarely outgrown; PA is the most common cause of food allergy in the US, and a leading cause of food-induced anaphylaxis and death after accidental exposure

peanut allergy

An IgE-mediated immediate hypersensitivity reaction to the consumption of peanuts (the seeds of Arachis hypogaea). Peanut allergens are designated Ara by the World Health Organization. Peanut allergy is the most important food allergy in the U.S., affecting more than a million people. Reactions range from mild (rashes) to life-threatening (closure of the airway, cardiac dysrhythmias, coma). About 50 people die of peanut allergy in the U.S. each year.

Patient care

People with known allergies to peanuts must avoid eating raw or processed peanuts and also products containing or prepared with peanut oil . Those affected by peanut allergy should learn to watch for the signs of anaphylaxis (hives, pruritus, rashes in the skin creases, shortness of breath, choking, wheezing, stridor). People with known anaphylaxis to peanuts should carry epinephrine injectors and use them at the onset of a hypersensitivity reaction. (Repeated use may be necessary in persistent reactions.) Cross-reactivity to other legumes (peas, soy products) may affect some people and pose important health risks. Affected people should wear medical alert bracelets or necklaces identifying their condition. Densensitization can be accomplished with modified peanut allergens.

See also: allergy

peanut allergy

An often severe form of ALLERGY in which up to one-third of sufferers experience ANAPHYLAXIS. Peanut allergy is not more common than other food allergies, all of which are rare, affecting about 1 person in 100,000 per year. It is becoming commoner, however, and is liable to be more severe than most, and is especially dangerous in asthmatic children. Peanut proteins may be found in such diverse foodstuffs as chocolate spread and scotch eggs. The allergy has been shown to be significantly associated with intake of soy milk or soy formula and with the use of skin preparations containing peanut oil. The increasing incidence is thought to be due to unduly early exposure of babies to peanut butter after weaning.
References in periodicals archive ?
The recent study consisted of a group of 56 children with peanut allergies, who were then dividen into two groups.
THE STUDY: The good news is parents finally have an answer to their question about how to best prevent peanut allergies in the LEAP study (Learning Early About Peanut allergy www.
Previous guidelines published in 2010 did not provide specific treatment strategies for peanut allergies because of a lack of research, but the significant results of the Learning Early About Peanut Allergy (LEAP) study suggested that early exposure to peanut-containing foods reduces the risk of developing allergies.
The study, which the researchers claim is the largest on the subject, analysed evidence from five studies on egg allergies in children and two on peanut allergies.
During this journey, she made much of the widespread claim that it is not in the medical profession's interest to actually determine the cause of peanut allergies.
Peanut allergies have increased by 350 percent in westernised countries over the last 20 years, with a recent Australian study finding that 10 percent of all 12monthold babies were allergic to peanuts, as well as 3 percent of all infants.
Peanut allergies were less common in children who had been eating peanut proteins than in those who did not consume them.
An experimental therapy that fed children with peanut allergies small amounts of peanut flour has helped more than 80 per cent of them safely eat a handful of the previously worrisome nuts.
SCOTS scientists have found a vital clue to why thousands of kids get deadly peanut allergies.
POTENTIALLY fatal childhood peanut allergies mainly affect better-off boys, research has shown.
They analysed the data on peanut allergies actually diagnosed by a doctor, rather than the actual incidence amongst a population.